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Tuesday 18, February

Angel Heart

Angel Heart

Tuesday 18, February

Impostors

Impostors

Tuesday 18, February

Dream Deceivers

Dream Deceivers

Tuesday 18, February

Wednesday 19, February

Newfilmmakers

Newfilmmakers

Evilspeak

Evilspeak

Wednesday 19, February

Dream Deceivers

Dream Deceivers

Wednesday 19, February

Thursday 20, February

The Witch

The Witch

Thursday 20, February

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 1

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 1

Thursday 20, February

Angel Heart

Angel Heart

Thursday 20, February

Friday 21, February

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 2: Hallelujah the Hills

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 2: Hallelujah the Hills

Friday 21, February

Saturday 22, February

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 3: Image, Flesh and Voice

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 3: Image, Flesh and Voice

Saturday 22, February

EC: The Rules of the Game

EC: The Rules of the Game

Saturday 22, February

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 4

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 4

Saturday 22, February

EC: The Flowers of St. Francis

EC: The Flowers of St. Francis

Saturday 22, February

Sunday 23, February

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 5

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 5

Sunday 23, February

EC: The Flowers of St. Francis

EC: The Flowers of St. Francis

Sunday 23, February

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 6

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 6

Sunday 23, February

EC: The Rules of the Game

EC: The Rules of the Game

Sunday 23, February

Monday 24, February

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 7: Branches

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 7: Branches

Monday 24, February

Tuesday 25, February

NYWIFT: Pennhurst

NYWIFT: Pennhurst

Tuesday 25, February

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 8

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 8

Tuesday 25, February

Wednesday 26, February

Newfilmmakers

Newfilmmakers

WR: Mysteries of the Organism

WR: Mysteries of the Organism

Wednesday 26, February

Thursday 27, February

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 1

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 1

Thursday 27, February

Hole in the Soul + short films

Hole in the Soul + short films

Thursday 27, February

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 3: Image, Flesh and Voice

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 3: Image, Flesh and Voice

Thursday 27, February

Friday 28, February

Man is Not a Bird

Man is Not a Bird

Friday 28, February

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 5

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 5

Friday 28, February

Love Affair, or The Case of the Missing Switchboar

Love Affair, or The Case of the Missing Switchboar

Friday 28, February

Saturday 29, February

Innocence Unprotected

Innocence Unprotected

Saturday 29, February

EC: Harry Smith

EC: Harry Smith

Saturday 29, February

WR: Mysteries of the Organism

WR: Mysteries of the Organism

Saturday 29, February

EC: Film No. 12 (Heaven and Earth Magic Feature)

EC: Film No. 12 (Heaven and Earth Magic Feature)

Saturday 29, February

Sweet Movie

Sweet Movie

Saturday 29, February

Sunday 1, March

Montenegro, or Pigs and Pearls

Montenegro, or Pigs and Pearls

Sunday 1, March

The Coca-Cola Kid

The Coca-Cola Kid

Sunday 1, March

EC: Ron Rice / Jack Smith

EC: Ron Rice / Jack Smith

Sunday 1, March

EC: Carriage Trade

EC: Carriage Trade

Sunday 1, March

Manifesto

Manifesto

Sunday 1, March

Monday 2, March

AFA MEMBERS ONLY: Millhouse: A White Comedy

AFA MEMBERS ONLY: Millhouse: A White Comedy

Monday 2, March

Tuesday 3, March

Gorilla Bathes at Noon

Gorilla Bathes at Noon

Tuesday 3, March

Man is Not a Bird

Man is Not a Bird

Tuesday 3, March

Wednesday 4, March

Newfilmmakers

Newfilmmakers

Love Affair, or The Case of the Missing Switchboar

Love Affair, or The Case of the Missing Switchboar

Wednesday 4, March

Sweet Movie

Sweet Movie

Wednesday 4, March

Thursday 5, March

Hackers

Hackers

PG-13

Thursday 5, March

Hole in the Soul + short films

Hole in the Soul + short films

Thursday 5, March

The Coca-Cola Kid

The Coca-Cola Kid

Thursday 5, March

The Net

The Net

Thursday 5, March

Friday 6, March

Johnny Mnemonic

Johnny Mnemonic

R

Friday 6, March

Montenegro, or Pigs and Pearls

Montenegro, or Pigs and Pearls

Friday 6, March

Manifesto

Manifesto

Friday 6, March

Virtuosity

Virtuosity

Friday 6, March

Saturday 7, March

Ghost in the Shell

Ghost in the Shell

Saturday 7, March

Strange Days

Strange Days

Saturday 7, March

Love Affair, or The Case of the Missing Switchboar

Love Affair, or The Case of the Missing Switchboar

Saturday 7, March

Innocence Unprotected

Innocence Unprotected

Saturday 7, March

Hackers

Hackers

PG-13

Saturday 7, March

Sunday 8, March

Strange Days

Strange Days

Sunday 8, March

Virtuosity

Virtuosity

Sunday 8, March

WR: Mysteries of the Organism

WR: Mysteries of the Organism

Sunday 8, March

Gorilla Bathes at Noon

Gorilla Bathes at Noon

Sunday 8, March

Johnny Mnemonic

Johnny Mnemonic

R

Sunday 8, March

Monday 9, March

Ghost in the Shell

Ghost in the Shell

Monday 9, March

The Sky of the Centaur

The Sky of the Centaur

Monday 9, March

The Net

The Net

Monday 9, March

Tuesday 10, March

The Net

The Net

Tuesday 10, March

Breakfast on Pluto

Breakfast on Pluto

Tuesday 10, March

Hackers

Hackers

PG-13

Tuesday 10, March

Wednesday 11, March

Newfilmmakers

Newfilmmakers

Strange Days

Strange Days

Wednesday 11, March

Thursday 12, March

Johnny Mnemonic

Johnny Mnemonic

R

Thursday 12, March

Everyday Dis/Comforts

Everyday Dis/Comforts

Thursday 12, March

Breakfast on Pluto

Breakfast on Pluto

Thursday 12, March

Ghost in the Shell

Ghost in the Shell

Thursday 12, March

Friday 13, March

Heimat is a Space in Time

Heimat is a Space in Time

Friday 13, March

Double Feature
Maggots and Men + Peace of Mind Maggots and Men + Peace of Mind

Maggots and Men + Peace of Mind

Friday 13, March

Saturday 14, March

Heimat is a Space in Time

Heimat is a Space in Time

Saturday 14, March

Maggots and Men

Maggots and Men

Saturday 14, March

Queer Genius

Queer Genius

Saturday 14, March

Sunday 15, March

Heimat is a Space in Time

Heimat is a Space in Time

Sunday 15, March

Queer Genius

Queer Genius

Sunday 15, March

Woubi Chéri

Woubi Chéri

Sunday 15, March

Monday 16, March

Heimat is a Space in Time

Heimat is a Space in Time

Monday 16, March

RE: Maciunas and Fluxus

RE: Maciunas and Fluxus

Monday 16, March

Tuesday 17, March

Heimat is a Space in Time

Heimat is a Space in Time

Tuesday 17, March

Everyday Dis/Comforts

Everyday Dis/Comforts

Tuesday 17, March

Woubi Chéri

Woubi Chéri

Tuesday 17, March

Wednesday 18, March

Newfilmmakers

Newfilmmakers

Heimat is a Space in Time

Heimat is a Space in Time

Wednesday 18, March

Thursday 19, March

Heimat is a Space in Time

Heimat is a Space in Time

Thursday 19, March

Friday 20, March

The Wolf House

The Wolf House

Friday 20, March

Saturday 21, March

The Wolf House

The Wolf House

Sunday 22, March

The Wolf House

The Wolf House

Monday 23, March

The Wolf House

The Wolf House

Monday 23, March

Tuesday 24, March

NYWIFT: American Poet Tato Laviera

NYWIFT: American Poet Tato Laviera

Tuesday 24, March

The Wolf House

The Wolf House

Tuesday 24, March

Wednesday 25, March

Newfilmmakers

Newfilmmakers

The Wolf House

The Wolf House

Wednesday 25, March

Thursday 26, March

The Wolf House

The Wolf House

Thursday 26, March

Friday 27, March

EC: Greed

EC: Greed

Friday 27, March

Saturday 28, March

EC: Greed

EC: Greed

Saturday 28, March

Sunday 29, March

EC: Greed

EC: Greed

Sunday 29, March

Monday 30, March

Keep Singing

Keep Singing

Monday 30, March

AFA MEMBERS ONLY: Millhouse: A White Comedy

AFA MEMBERS ONLY: Millhouse: A White Comedy

AFA MEMBERS ONLY – FREE SCREENING!

Emile de Antonio’s MILLHOUSE: A WHITE COMEDY

Once every calendar we offer a special, AFA Members-Only screening, featuring sneak-previews of upcoming features, programs of rare materials from Anthology’s collections, in-person filmmaker presentations, and more! The benefits of an Anthology membership have always been plentiful: free admission to over 100 Essential Cinema programs, reduced admission to all other shows, discounted AFA publications. But with these screenings – free and open only to members – we sweeten the pot even further.

This calendar we present a screening of Emile de Antonio’s MILLHOUSE: A WHITE COMEDY. A satirical yet multi-faceted portrait of Richard Nixon, de Antonio’s rarely-seen film has never been more timely. And in the context of Anthology’s winter programming, it supplements our comprehensive retrospective (February 20-27) devoted to the work of filmmaker, artist, illustrator, and cinematographer Ed Emshwiller, insofar as Emshwiller served as de Antonio’s cameraman on the project (click here for more details about the Emshwiller retrospective).

Become a member at our box office, or at anthologyfilmarchives.org

Emile de Antonio

MILLHOUSE: A WHITE COMEDY

1971, 92 min, 35mm. Photographed by Ed Emshwiller.

This portrait of Richard Milhous Nixon was a surprising departure from the previous work of renowned documentary filmmaker Emile de Antonio (POINT OF ORDER, IN THE YEAR OF THE PIG). It is largely comedic and the character it creates is not entirely unsympathetic. Despite the cutting satirization of Nixon’s manipulative side, MILLHOUSE also reveals a resourceful Horatio Alger figure. The filmmaker said he wanted viewers “to understand this poor boy from the lower middle classes with the burning desire and energy.” However, MILLHOUSE is also a continuation of de Antonio’s work in compilation documentary. Just before the 1968 election, he sought, in vain, for a print of Nixon’s “Checkers Speech,” telecast in 1952 but unseen since. He wanted it screened in theaters, to remind viewers about the “old Nixon.” Then, in 1970, two anonymous souls left de Antonio hundreds of cans of news film, footage of Nixon said to be purloined from NBC. Not only was this the core material for MILLHOUSE, the collection also contained a complete kinescope of the 1952 broadcast. When de Antonio’s WHITE COMEDY premiered in June 1971, his distributor, New Yorker Films, simultaneously gave a theatrical release to “Nixon’s Checkers Speech,” as a short attached to Saul Landau’s new documentary FIDEL.

SCREENING AT 7:30; RECEPTION AT 7:00!

Monday 2, March

Angel Heart

Angel Heart

by Alan Parker

1987, 113 min, 35mm-to-DCP

With Mickey Rourke, Robert De Niro, Lisa Bonet, and Charlotte Rampling.

Causing a mild controversy at the time of its release for its flirtation with an X rating (thanks to the steamy, stylized sex scenes between Mickey Rourke and Lisa Bonet), ANGEL HEART is a strange, ultra-eighties fusion of hard-boiled detective story and supernatural thriller. Alan Parker’s decision to move the action from New York to New Orleans underscores a popular (if misplaced) association between Voodoo and Satanism, but nevertheless sets the stage for Bonet, who in her big-screen debut makes a sharp U-turn from her days as Denise Huxtable on THE COSBY SHOW. On preparing for the role of Epiphany Proudfoot, Bonet said, “I did a lot of meditation and a lot of self-inquiry. I did some research on voodoo. My earnest endeavor was really to let go of all my inhibitions. It was really necessary for me to be able to let go of Lisa and let Epiphany take over.”

Set in the 1950s, ANGEL HEART follows Harry Angel (Rourke) as a private eye who is hired by one Louis Cyphre (Robert De Niro) to track down legendary singer Johnny Favorite. When everyone he questions turns up dead, Angel learns of Favorite’s connection to the dark arts and begins to wonder if his benefactor is hiding his true identity (apparently his private investigator skills don’t extend to a grasp of wordplay). Generating a palpable atmosphere of creeping dread and erotic tension, and made with style to spare, ANGEL HEART exerts a truly devilish grip.

Tuesday 18, February

Thursday 20, February

Show Future Dates
Breakfast on Pluto

Breakfast on Pluto

by Neil Jordon

2005, 128 min, 35mm

With Cillian Murphy, Stephen Rea, Brendan Gleeson, and Liam Neeson.

Based on the novel by Patrick McCabe, BREAKFAST ON PLUTO spins a whimsical yet powerful survival story of an Irish infant abandoned by his mother. The child is discovered by Father Liam (Liam Neeson), coincidentally his real father, and placed in an abusive foster home. As he grows, Patrick (Cillian Murphy) becomes an extravagantly fashionable trans teen, renames herself Kitten, and sets out for London with a rock group in hopes of finding her mother.

Tuesday 10, March

Thursday 12, March

Show Future Dates
Dream Deceivers

Dream Deceivers

by David Van Taylor

1991, 58 min, 16mm

“This slash-and-burn documentary is a Sunbelt grotesque: it’s the unrelievedly saddening story of James Vance, a teen in Reno, Nevada, who shot himself in the face with a shotgun shortly after his best friend did the same. Vance’s fundamentalist family later argued in court that his attempted suicide (his friend’s was successful) was inspired by subliminal messages in the music of British heavy-metal band Judas Priest. Director Van Taylor pulls off a neat hat trick, gaining the confidence of Vance and his family, the rock band, and a trio of local losers to create, scene by scene, a despairing mosaic of alcoholism, drug use, and violence – and that’s just Vance’s God-fearing parents. Defenders of heavy metal know that blaming the music for antisocial behavior is blaming a symptom on a symptom, and Van Taylor makes that case thoroughly but not preachily. He also well limns what seems to be a curious dispassion on the part of the Priesters, and gives a whole lot of screen time to doomed young Vance, reminding us that things like rock music, the legal system, and even God himself don’t mean much to a 19-year-old without a face.” –Bill Wyman, CHICAGO READER

On Sat, Feb 15 and Wed, Feb 19, DREAM DECEIVERS screens with:

Tommy Turner & David Wojnarowicz

WHERE EVIL DWELLS

1985, 33 min, Super-8mm-to-16mm

“WHERE EVIL DWELLS originated as a scripted project based on the sensational story of teen killer Ricky Kasso, self-described ‘Acid King’ of Northport, Long Island, who sparked 80s panic over heavy metal and Satanism after the pseudo-ritualistic murder of a fellow teen in the woods. Shooting off a script based on interviews with Kasso’s associates, Turner and Wojnarowicz ultimately edited their footage into a 30-minute trailer’ that represents an anarchic and wildly expressionistic take on what Wojnarowicz described as ‘the imposed Hell of the suburbs’ – something of a cross between FLAMING CREATURES, FRIDAY THE 13TH, and AC/DC. It’s a cacophonous hymn to Satan, metal, terminal boredom, and homicidal stupidity.” –Jon Dieringer, SCREEN SLATE

On Tues, Feb 18, DREAM DECEIVERS screens with:

Pia Borg

DEMONIC

2019, 29 min, digital

This brand-new film by Australian experimental filmmaker Pia Borg explicitly addresses the phenomenon of Satanic Panic via a collage of archival material (including 1980s televised reports reflecting how widely the fears of Satanic ritual abuse were distributed by the media) and historical reconstructions. Often amusing, but ultimately terrifying in its depiction of a not-so-distant runaway train of psychiatric excesses, media sensationalism, and false memories, DEMONIC revisits a period in which the culture truly did become possessed, albeit by forces that were not supernatural but all too human.

Tuesday 18, February

Wednesday 19, February

Show Future Dates
EC: Carriage Trade

EC: Carriage Trade

by Warren Sonbert

1973 version, 61 min, 16mm

“With CARRIAGE TRADE, Sonbert began to challenge the theories espoused by the great Soviet filmmakers of the 1920s; he particularly disliked the ‘knee-jerk’ reaction produced by Eisensteinian montage. In both lectures and writings about his own style of editing, Sonbert described CARRIAGE TRADE as ‘a jig-saw puzzle of postcards to produce varied displaced effects.’ This approach, according to Sonbert, ultimately affords the viewer multi-faceted readings of the connections between shots through the spectator’s assimilation of ‘the changing relations of the movement of objects, the gestures of figures, familiar worldwide icons, rituals and reactions, rhythm, spacing, and density of images.” –Jon Gartenberg

Sunday 1, March

EC: Film No. 12 (Heaven and Earth Magic Feature)

EC: Film No. 12 (Heaven and Earth Magic Feature)

by Harry Smith

1957-62, 66 min, 16mm, b&w

Preserved by Anthology Film Archives with support from the National Film Preservation Foundation and Cineric, Inc.

“NO. 12 can be seen as one moment – certainly the most elaborately crafted moment – of the single alchemical film which is Harry Smith’s life work. In its seriousness, its austerity, it is one of the strangest and most fascinating landmarks in the history of cinema. Its elaborately constructed soundtrack in which the sounds of various figures are systematically displaced onto other images reflects Smith’s abiding concern with auditory effects.” –P. Adams Sitney

Saturday 29, February

EC: Greed

EC: Greed

by Erich von Stroheim

140 min, 1924, 35mm, b&w, silent

With Gibson Gowland, ZaSu Pitts, and Jean Hersholt.

“Reduced from an eight-and-a-half-hour running time to slightly over two hours, [GREED] is perhaps more famous for the butcher job performed on it than for Stroheim’s great and genuine accomplishment. Though usually discussed as a masterpiece of realism (it was based on a novel by the naturalist writer Frank Norris), it is equally sublime in its high stylization, which ranges from the highly Brechtian spectacle of ZaSu Pitts making love to her gold coins to deep-focus compositions every bit as advanced as those in CITIZEN KANE. It is probably the most modern in feel of all silent films, establishing ideas that would not be developed until decades later.” –Dave Kehr, CHICAGO READER

Friday 27, March

Saturday 28, March

Sunday 29, March

Show Future Dates
EC: Harry Smith

EC: Harry Smith

FILM NOS. 1-5, 7, 10 (EARLY ABSTRACTIONS) (ca. 1946-57, 23 min, 16mm-to-35mm. Restored by Anthology Film Archives and The Film Foundation with funding provided by the George Lucas Family Foundation.)

FILM NO. 11 (MIRROR ANIMATIONS) (ca. 1957, 4 min, 16mm. Newly preserved by Anthology Film Archives!)

FILM NO. 14 (LATE SUPERIMPOSITIONS) (1964, 28 min, 16mm)

FILM NO. 16 (OZ: THE TIN WOODMAN’S DREAM) (ca. 1967, 15 min, 35mm, silent)

“My cinematic excreta is of four varieties: – batiked animations made directly on film between 1939 and 1946; optically printed non-objective studies composed around 1950; semi-realistic animated collages made as part of my alchemical labors of 1957 to 1962; and chronologically super-imposed photographs of actualities formed since the latter year. All these works have been organized in specific patterns derived from the interlocking beats of the respiration, the heart and the EEG Alpha component and should be observed together in order, or not at all, for they are valuable works, works that will forever abide – they made me gray.” –Harry Smith

Total running time: ca. 75 min.

Saturday 29, February

EC: Ron Rice / Jack Smith

EC: Ron Rice / Jack Smith

Jack Smith

SCOTCH TAPE (1962, 3 min, 16mm)

A junkyard musical.

Jack Smith

FLAMING CREATURES

1963, 45 min, 16mm, b&w

“[Smith] graced the anarchic liberation of new American cinema with graphic and rhythmic power worthy of the best of formal cinema. He has attained for the first time in motion pictures a high level of art which is absolutely lacking in decorum; and a treatment of sex which makes us aware of the restraint of all previous filmmakers.” –FILM CULTURE

Ron Rice

CHUMLUM (1964, 23 min, 16mm-to-35mm. With Jack Smith, Beverly Grant, Mario Montez, Joel Markman, Frances Francine, Guy Henson, Barry Titus, Zelda Nelson, Gerard Malanga, Barbara Rubin, and Frances Stillman. Music by Angus MacLise. Restored by Anthology Film Archives and The Film Foundation with funding provided by the George Lucas Family Foundation.)

“A hallucinatory micro-epic filmed during lulls in the production of Smith’s NORMAL LOVE and one of the great ‘heroic doses’ of ’60s underground cinema, a movie so sumptuously and serenely psychedelic it appears to have been printed entirely on gauze.” –Chuck Stephens, CINEMA SCOPE

Total running time: ca. 75 min.

Sunday 1, March

EC: The Flowers of St. Francis

EC: The Flowers of St. Francis

by Roberto Rossellini

In Italian with English subtitles, 1949, 85 min, 35mm, b&w

(FRANCESCO, GIULIARE DI DIO)

“Roberto Rossellini’s buoyant 1950 masterpiece is a glorious hallucination of perfect harmony between man and nature. The Franciscans arrive at Assisi in the first reel and leave in the last. In between, as they say, nothing happens and everything happens. Rossellini is able to suggest the scope and rhythm of an entire lost way of life through a gradual accumulation of well-observed detail. The Franciscans are at once inspired and slightly foolish, but Rossellini maintains a profound respect for the grandeur of their delusions. A great film, all the more impressive for being apparently effortless.” –Dave Kehr

Saturday 22, February

Sunday 23, February

Show Future Dates
EC: The Rules of the Game

EC: The Rules of the Game

by Jean Renoir

In French with English subtitles, 1939, 97 min, 35mm, b&w

(LA RÈGLE DU JEU)

“Detested when it first appeared (for satirizing the French ruling class on the brink of the Second World War), almost destroyed by brutal cutting, restored in 1959 to virtually its original form, THE RULES OF THE GAME is now universally acknowledged as a masterpiece and perhaps Renoir’s supreme achievement. Its extreme complexity (it seems, after more than 20 viewings, one of the cinema’s few truly inexhaustible films) makes it peculiarly difficult to write about briefly.” –Robin Wood

Saturday 22, February

Sunday 23, February

Show Future Dates
Ed Emshwiller: PGM 1

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 1

This program represents a brief introduction to Ed Emshwiller’s work as a filmmaker, including three of his earliest films which have been newly preserved for this retrospective. These films demonstrate Emshwiller’s interest in merging human figures with an abstract, kinetic environment, as well as his unique approach to sound and rhythm.

Ed Emshwiller PAINTINGS BY ED EMSHWILLER (1955-58, 10 min, 16mm. Preserved through a collaboration between Anthology Film Archives and Lightbox Film Center.)

Ed Emshwiller TRANSFORMATION (1959, 5 min, 16mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives.)

Ed Emshwiller DANCE CHROMATIC (1959, 7 min, 16mm. Preserved through a collaboration between Anthology Film Archives and Lightbox Film Center.)

Ed Emshwiller LIFELINES (1960, 7 min, 16mm. Preserved through a collaboration between Anthology Film Archives and Lightbox Film Center.)

Ed Emshwiller THANATOPSIS (1962, 6 min, 16mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives.)

Ed Emshwiller RELATIVITY (1966, 38 min, 16mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives with support from the National Film Preservation Foundation.)

Total running time: ca. 75 min.

Thursday 20, February

Thursday 27, February

Show Future Dates
Ed Emshwiller: PGM 2: Hallelujah the Hills

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 2: Hallelujah the Hills

Adolfas Mekas

HALLELUJAH THE HILLS

1963, 80 min, 35mm. With Peter H. Beard, Sheila Finn, Martin Greenbaum, Peggy Steffans, Jerome Raphael, Blanche Dee, Jerome Hill, Taylor Mead, and Ed Emshwiller.

This feature film by Adolfas Mekas is a farcical, experimental slapstick comedy set in the woods of Vermont. Jack and Leo both pine for the love of Vera, but their sophomoric antics get the best of them, as does the brutish Gideon, played by Ed Emshwiller, who ultimately wins over Vera. HALLELUJAH THE HILLS is the New American Cinema at its most unhinged.

“Imagine a combination of HUCKLEBERRY FINN, PULL MY DAISY, the Marx Brothers, and the complete works of Douglas Fairbanks, Mary Pickford, and D.W. Griffith, and you’ve got it. What have you got? A film which is both deliriously funny and ravishingly lyrical.” –Richard Roud, THE GUARDIAN

Preceded by:

Leon Prochnik THE EXISTENTIALIST (1964, 8 min, 16mm. Photographed by Ed Emshwiller.)

A walk through the city where not everything is as it seems.

Total running time: ca. 90 min.

Friday 21, February

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 3: Image, Flesh and Voice

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 3: Image, Flesh and Voice

Adolfas Mekas

HALLELUJAH THE HILLS

1963, 80 min, 35mm. With Peter H. Beard, Sheila Finn, Martin Greenbaum, Peggy Steffans, Jerome Raphael, Blanche Dee, Jerome Hill, Taylor Mead, and Ed Emshwiller.

This feature film by Adolfas Mekas is a farcical, experimental slapstick comedy set in the woods of Vermont. Jack and Leo both pine for the love of Vera, but their sophomoric antics get the best of them, as does the brutish Gideon, played by Ed Emshwiller, who ultimately wins over Vera. HALLELUJAH THE HILLS is the New American Cinema at its most unhinged.

“Imagine a combination of HUCKLEBERRY FINN, PULL MY DAISY, the Marx Brothers, and the complete works of Douglas Fairbanks, Mary Pickford, and D.W. Griffith, and you’ve got it. What have you got? A film which is both deliriously funny and ravishingly lyrical.” –Richard Roud, THE GUARDIAN

Preceded by:

Leon Prochnik THE EXISTENTIALIST (1964, 8 min, 16mm. Photographed by Ed Emshwiller.)

A walk through the city where not everything is as it seems.

Total running time: ca. 90 min.

Saturday 22, February

Thursday 27, February

Show Future Dates
Ed Emshwiller: PGM 4

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 4

Ed Emshwiller FREEDOM MARCH (1963, 9 min, 16mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives.)

This rarely-screened short film documents the historic 1963 march on Washington, DC.

Jack Willis STREETS OF GREENWOOD (1963, 20 min, 16mm. Photographed by Ed Emshwiller. Print courtesy of Washington University in St. Louis.)

A short documentary about the efforts of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) to register voters in rural Mississippi. The film is a remarkable document of the civil-rights-era southern United States. The concert featured in the film includes an early performance by Bob Dylan which was ultimately used in the 1967 D.A. Pennebaker film, DON’T LOOK BACK.

Jean-Bernard Bucky & Robert Peyton

REPORT

1970, 60 min, 16mm. Photographed by Ed Emshwiller. Courtesy of Jean-Bernard Bucky.

This film is one of several projects related to Emshwiller’s time as Film Advisor and Cinematographer at UC Berkeley in 1968. REPORT is a chronicle of Norman Jacobson’s attempt to conduct an experimental class called “Toward the Expression of the Idea of Freedom.”

Total running time: ca. 95 min.

Saturday 22, February

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 5

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 5

Ed Emshwiller CAROL (1970, 5 min, 16mm. Preserved by Anthology Film Archives.)

This elegant film portrait of Carol Emshwiller uses images from a forest – trees shimmering in the sunlight – to frame its subject. A simple score composed on thumb piano combines with double-exposed images to capture the poetry of the everyday.

Ed Emshwiller TOTEM (1963, 16 min, 16mm)

“A filmic interpretation of the ballet TOTEM by Alwin Nikolais. A cine-dance in which the choreography often comes as much from camera movement and film editing as from the dancers. A mysterious, primordial, and ritualistic sequence of movements.” –Ed Emshwiller

Ed Emshwiller FUSION (1967, 16 min, 16mm. Courtesy of the Jerome Robbins Dance Division, The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.)

“A cine-dance film sponsored by Springs Mills to promote a new line of towels designed by Pucci. Dancers throw, move through, dance with, and are draped in a variety of designer towels.” –Ed Emshwiller

Ed Emshwiller FILM WITH THREE DANCERS (1970, 20 min, 16mm)

“Three dancers are seen in different ways. They are seen in formal movements combined and transformed by cinematic techniques. They are shown in semi-documentary fashion, in surreal fashion. They reveal themselves, their aesthetics, their method of working together. The film is an exploration of ways of seeing, of ways of showing dancers.” –Ed Emshwiller

Ed Emshwiller CHRYSALIS (1973, 22 min, 16mm)

“Dancers coming from a black void move in slow, normal, and rapid motion. They are transformed by light, by pixilation, by projections on them, by their actions and costumes. They pass through a series of violent, humorous, and strange states, emerging in a form of rebirth.” –Ed Emshwiller

Total running time: ca. 85 min.

Sunday 23, February

Friday 28, February

Show Future Dates
Ed Emshwiller: PGM 6

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 6

Ed Emshwiller WOE OH HO NO (1972, 13 min, 16mm-to-DCP)

Collaboratively produced at Wantagh High School in New York, WOE OH HO NO ventures into the unconscious mind of the average student.

Ed Emshwiller IDENTITIES (1973, 10 min, 16mm)

This is the second of the two short films Emshwiller created with Wantagh High School students.

Ed Emshwiller

FAMILY FOCUS

1975, 58 min, video

“FAMILY FOCUS is an Emshwiller family self-portrait, a stylized group autobiography. It was recorded for the most part with a black and white video portapak over a span of a year and a half. One series of Christmas movies shows the growth of the children covering 20 years. The camera was available for spontaneous taping by members of the family. It is documentary/video art transformation of self-revealing images, a playful ironic tape.” –Ed Emshwiller

Total running time: ca. 85 min.

Sunday 23, February

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 7: Branches

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 7: Branches

Ed Emshwiller

BRANCHES

1970, 102 min, 16mm

“Featuring Bill Weidner and Connie Brady, BRANCHES was made in a filmmaking workshop at Cornell University during the summer of 1970. The film was improvised around the theme of Branches of Possibilities real or imagined in Bill’s pursuit of Connie. It is an attempt to structure a film out of the concerns of the time, using the college environment and student sexual drives as the principle focus.” –Ed Emshwiller

Monday 24, February

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 8

Ed Emshwiller: PGM 8

Ed Emshwiller SCAPE-MATES (1972, 28 min, 16mm)

“SCAPE-MATES is a videotape which combines dancers with an environment made by computer animation. It starts with an electronic ‘big bang’; is seen to be a frame within a frame; body parts suggest primitive life forms; disembodied heads engage in a series of encounters, a strange passage in a vast open space. A monolith changes into an angular, serpentine statue which moves with the dancers. The dancers, filled with electronic flames, emerge and leap about in a place charged with spiraling energy. All elements go through rapid and radical transformations, ending in an architectural maze before disintegration. A mythic, evolutionary journey.” –Ed Emshwiller

Ed Emshwiller

PILOBOLUS AND JOAN

1973, 58 min, video

“Based on ‘Metamorphosed’ by Carol Emshwiller (a reversal of Kafka’s ‘Metamorphosis’). A cockroach wakes up as a four-man-being, falls in love with a girl, and proceeds to encounter the human world. A humorous, surreal journey with a remarkable dance company.” –Ed Emshwiller

Ed Emshwiller SUNSTONE (1979, 4 min, 16mm)

“Symbolic and poetic, SUNSTONE is a pivotal work in the development of an electronic language to articulate three-dimensional space. The opening image is an iconic face, which appears to be electronically ‘carved’ from stone. A mystical third eye, brilliantly crafted from a digital palette, radiates with vibrant transformations of color and texture. Sculpting electronically, Emshwiller then transforms perspectival representation: the archetypal ‘sunstone’ is revealed to be one facet of an open, revolving cube, each side of which holds a simultaneously visible, moving video image.” –ELECTRONIC ARTS INTERMIX

Total running time: ca. 95 min.

Tuesday 25, February

Everyday Dis/Comforts

Everyday Dis/Comforts

Through international lenses, this program of short films resists the banality of work and home life, to challenge notions of the everyday. The works collected here consider cinematic histories, real-time transformation as mitigated by digital culture, BDSM as institutional critique, and post-porn labor. Collaging staged actions and voice, VIDEO HOME SYSTEM traces the convergence of politics and pop culture through the 1980s and 90s in Pakistan, showing how bootleg VHS tapes fostered queer imaginaries during eras of censorship. Composed entirely of Snapchat videos, SNAP follows three trans millennials as they document their lives, reflecting the inseparable relationship between body and technology, while the tragicomedy PIEDAD follows three sex-workers who cross the line to fill a deceased client’s wishes. In THE ISLAND OF PERPETUAL TICKLING (III), Vika Kirchenbauer discusses how tickling serves as a metaphor in theoretical texts, before she undergoes “tickle torture” at the hands of two fellow artists.

Sharlene Bamboat VIDEO HOME SYSTEM (2018, 19 min, digital)

Felipe Elgueta & Ananké Pereira SNAP (2018, 20 min, digital)

Vika Kirchenbauer THE ISLAND OF PERPETUAL TICKLING (III) (2018, 13 min, digital)

Naya Pascual (The Outdoor Cat) PIEDAD (2018, 16 min, digital)

Total running time: ca. 75 min.

Thursday 12, March

Tuesday 17, March

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Evilspeak

Evilspeak

by Eric Weston

1981, 97 min, 35mm. Archival print courtesy of the University of North Carolina School of the Arts.

Normally relegated in cinema to supporting parts, and in life to the status of younger brother of Ron Howard, actor Clint Howard enjoys a rare leading role in EVILSPEAK, and he commits to it with the wild abandon that could come only from a performer with a nagging sense that he may never headline a film again. Howard stars as Stanley Coppersmith, a teenage outcast who’s bullied by everyone at a strict military academy. When Stanley discovers the crypt of a 16th-century Satanist beneath the chapel, he creates a computerized Black Mass that unleashes unholy revenge upon his tormentors. EVILSPEAK is a peerlessly entertaining mix of high-school revenge tropes, Satanic iconography, and then-cutting-edge Apple II computer technology.

Wednesday 19, February

Ghost in the Shell

Ghost in the Shell

by Mamoru Oshii

In Japanese with English subtitles, 1995, 83 min, 35mm-to-DCP

(KÔKAKU KIDÔTAI)

Part techno-noir, part philosophy thesis, the groundbreaking cyberpunk anime GHOST IN THE SHELL (based on the manga by Shirow Masamune) eerily anticipated our global technological scenario, not only in how people have surrendered their minds and bodies to tech but also how networked capital has managed to transcend national borders where humans cannot. In 2029 (in a futuristic city modeled on Hong Kong), a cyborg agent named Major Motoko Kusanagi is assigned to hunt the “Puppet Master,” a state-owned hacker who has gone rogue and started hijacking people’s brains. Throughout her pursuit, Kusanagi becomes increasingly inquisitive about the nature of her identity as attached to her government-owned cyborg body, and begins to yearn for consciousness beyond what she knows. The film is dizzyingly gorgeous, produced with a combination of traditional cel animation and computer graphics that has distinguished it from the more dated live-action sci-fi of the era. Released a decade after the publication of Donna Haraway’s seminal essay “A Cyborg Manifesto,” GHOST IN THE SHELL captures the tech tension that Harraway sought to overcome in the promise of the cyborg: while technology promises liberation as it reinscribes the same boundaries and social control we’re trying to escape, maybe the solution isn’t denying the cyborg but dissolving into it. Perhaps it will take the posthuman for us to seize our humanity once and for all. –Stephanie Monohan

With:

Lynn Hershman Leeson SEDUCTION OF A CYBORG (1994, 6 min, digital)

A woman’s cybernetic eye surgery opens a path for simulacra addiction and immune system failure in Leeson’s prescient short, which portrays the shrunken world touted by the internet as threat more than promise, the small portal of the computer screen the limits of a cage. The woman’s own biorhythm is disrupted to the point of collapse by a growing appetite for images, even as “she witnessed the pollution of history” in their viewing. In keeping with Leeson’s focus on the death of privacy via technology, we observe the woman’s overseers observing as she loses individuality, becoming a signal. The analog tech used (reel-to-reel stacks) seems quaintly archaic given its implications, but echoes the woman’s (and by extension our) hunger for tactility fed by empty digital calories. –Danielle Burgos

Saturday 7, March

Monday 9, March

Thursday 12, March

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Gorilla Bathes at Noon

Gorilla Bathes at Noon

by Dušan Makavejev

In English, Russian, and German with English subtitles, 1993, 83 min, 35mm

(GORILA SE KUPA U PODNE)

Makavejev’s penultimate feature film, GORILLA BATHES AT NOON is a profound intellectual and emotional reflection on the end of the Cold War and the collapse of “really existing socialism” in Europe. As Soviet troops are retreating from Berlin, a major in the Red Army (played by Svetozar Cvetković) misses his train and decides to stay behind and live on “no man’s land.” With this film Makavejev returned to and further refined his distinct montage-based approach to filmmaking. The footage of Lenin’s decapitated head hovering over Berlin is a must see!

Tuesday 3, March

Sunday 8, March

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Hackers

Hackers

PG-13

by Iain Softley

1995, 107 min, 35mm

A box-office flop at the time of its release, HACKERS has re-emerged as a midnight favorite for wannabe phone phreaks and keyboard cowboys. Jonny Lee Miller plays a snarky hacker wunderkind who rollerblades his way into NYC and a new school, where he meets a gang of fellow techie teens (Angelina Jolie, Matthew Lillard, Jesse Bradford, and more) with whom he wreaks cyber havoc. They soon stumble into a corporate conspiracy where they face off against a savvy cyber-security officer named “The Plague” (Fisher Stevens, playing one of the silliest of movie villains), and yes, hack the planet. HACKERS is a 90s internet subculture time-capsule, full of fishnet shirts, floppy disks, The Prodigy on its soundtrack, and hacker handles that a middle schooler might carve into their skateboard deck (“Acid Burn,” anyone?). But it is also a sincere attempt at capturing the anarchic spirit of cyberpunk that Softley and screenwriter Rafael Moreu, who spent significant time embedded in hacker meetups online and off, clearly admired. As we currently engage with an internet whose functionality is way more user-friendly but whose promise is way less radical, even the clumsily psychedelic depictions of a literal “cyberspace” in HACKERS at least stokes the imagination. –Stephanie Monohan

With:

Fabrice Florin HACKERS: WIZARDS OF THE ELECTRONIC AGE (1985, 26 min, digital)

This is the definitive documentary chronicle of 1980s computer culture and one of the foundational cinematic texts of Silicon Valley mythology. Shot over a weekend at Whole Earth Catalog’s hacker convention, WIZARDS draws on interviews with figures including Richard Stallman, Steve Wozniak, and Susan Kare to represent how hackers and hobbyists were ushering in a communication revolution encompassing anarchists, entrepreneurs, and artists. A historically significant and engaging portrait of figures at the digital frontier. –Jon Dieringer

Thursday 5, March

Saturday 7, March

Tuesday 10, March

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Heimat is a Space in Time

Heimat is a Space in Time

by Thomas Heise

In German with English subtitles, 2019, 218 min, DCP

(HEIMAT IST EIN RAUM AUS ZEIT)

U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! Distributed by Icarus Films. Co-presented by the Goethe-Institut New York.

In HEIMAT IS A SPACE IN TIME, German filmmaker Thomas Heise shares the stories of three generations of his family, in their own words. Using a matter-of-fact, uninflected tone, he reads a wealth of letters and notes from relatives who lived through the horrors of the First World War and Nazi Germany, and later contended with life in Communist East Germany and in the wake of the fall of the Berlin Wall.

HEIMAT IS A SPACE IN TIME defies easy description. Heise offers no context, no talking heads, no analysis. Yet this unadorned approach, coupled with the potent imagery accompanying the words, becomes overwhelmingly powerful. One particularly memorable sequence involves Heise’s grandparents, a “mixed” Jewish-Gentile couple living in Vienna during the Nazi era. Their letters capture the increasing measures taken against Jews: finding themselves banished from buses, losing access to coal ration cards, and ultimately undergoing forced removal to a concentration camp in Poland. As Heise recites the letters, documents listing the names of Jews slated for deportation scroll by on the screen for nearly half an hour.

Clearly influenced by his own previous work (much of it banned in the former East Germany, where he lived until the fall of the Wall), HEIMAT is the culmination of Heise’s career. It is an understated epic that brilliantly marries the written word, image, and sound design. The unspoken message is that the past, even as those who remember it slip away, remains with us.

“Such is Heise’s mastery that across this 218-minute-long film you find yourself sometimes on the verge of tears, sometimes laughing out loud, sometimes shaking your head in wonder, completely ensnared by image, sound, text.” –Ruchir Joshi, THE TELEGRAPH

“The overall effect of Heise’s work is mesmeric, persuasive and cumulatively powerful, as each piece of the puzzle falls into place and he lands on overarching insights into a German century and what it portends for the future.” –Scott Tobias, VARIETY

Friday 13, March

Saturday 14, March

Sunday 15, March

Monday 16, March

Tuesday 17, March

Wednesday 18, March

Thursday 19, March

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Hole in the Soul + short films

Hole in the Soul + short films

by Dušan Makavejev

In English and Serbo-Croatian with English subtitles, 1994, 52 min, 16mm-to-digital

(RUPA U DUŠI)

The coda to Makavejev’s career is a medium-length autobiography made for BBC Scotland. In the form of a reflective audiovisual essay, Makavejev takes the temperature of his native city of Belgrade, and laments the violent disintegration of his Yugoslav homeland. In some ways a farewell to cinema and a life sustained by it, this is one of Makavejev’s most emotional works.

Preceded by:

COLORS ARE DREAMING / BOJE SANJAJU (1958, 8 min, 35mm. In Serbo-Croatian with English subtitles. Preserved print courtesy of the Austrian Film Museum.)

DAMNED HOLIDAY / PROKLETI PRAZNIK (1958, 9 min, 35mm. In Serbo-Croatian with English subtitles. Preserved print courtesy of the Austrian Film Museum.)

BEEKEEPER’S SCRAPBOOK / SLIKOVNICA PČELARA (1958, 9 min, 35mm. In Serbo-Croatian with English subtitles. Preserved print courtesy of the Austrian Film Museum.)

NEW DOMESTIC ANIMAL / NOVA DOMAĆA ŽIVOTINJA (1964, 10 min, 35mm. No dialogue.)

Total running time: ca. 95 min.

Thursday 27, February

Thursday 5, March

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Impostors

Impostors

by Mark Rappaport

1979, 110 min, 16mm. Courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art.

With Charles Ludlam.

“A strange, obsessive, darkly funny film that Rappaport has described as ‘an unholy union between THE MALTESE FALCON and REMEMBRANCE OF THINGS PAST’ – although that overlooks the obvious references to Cole Porter, Boris Karloff, Jean Cocteau and the Three Stooges. Sinister, silly, and sometimes murderous twins named Chuckie and Mikey track down an Egyptian treasure while performing a magic act with their assistant, Tina. She is romanced by Peter, a soulfully glum young man who is bothered by, among other things, Tina’s apparent yen for Gina, her former partner in what Chuckie euphemistically calls ‘a tumbling act.’ […] [A] sober meditation on false and true love and the ways in which fictions of romance (particularly Hollywood’s fictions) permeate our lives.” –Gene Siskel, CHICAGO TRIBUNE

Tuesday 18, February

Innocence Unprotected

Innocence Unprotected

by Dušan Makavejev

In Serbo-Croatian and German with English subtitles, 1968, 75 min, 35mm. Print courtesy of the British Film Institute.

(NEVINOST BEZ ZAŠTITE)

An unclassifiable mash-up of the cinematic readymade and the biographical documentary, this is filmmaking as film historiography, in which the border between reality and fiction is deftly negotiated by Makavejev and his early partner in crime Branko Vučićević. Dragoljub Aleksić stars as himself, an acrobat-turned-film-director, living his last years in the golden age of Yugoslavia’s self-managing socialism.

Saturday 29, February

Saturday 7, March

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Johnny Mnemonic

Johnny Mnemonic

R

by Robert Longo

1995, 96 min, 35mm

With Keanu Reeves, Dolph Lundgren, Takeshi Kitano, Ice-T, Henry Rollins, Barbara Sukowa, and Udo Kier.

Too little sci-fi for hardcore cyberpunks, not enough action for those expecting future-SPEED, the sole feature film from artist Robert Longo (1980s “Men in the Cities” series) was unfairly maligned as a BLADE RUNNER retread on release, yet managed to nail mega-corporate casual cruelty with greater accuracy than Ridley Scott’s take. Keanu Reeves stars as mnemonic courier Johnny, physically ferrying information too sensitive to send over the ’net via a brain implant with the exact data capacity of a 2007 6th-generation iPod (80GB). Installation has displaced his memories, and to get them back Johnny takes on a high-risk job that crosses the yakuza, ruthless drug company Pharmacom, and risks frying Johnny’s brain if he doesn’t download the data in time. Featuring a cast for the ages and written by cyberpunk inventor William Gibson, who was disappointed that the film’s talking-dolphin heroin addiction subplot was cut by Sony, JOHNNY MNEMONIC is Hollywood’s accidentally accurate look at capitalist cyber-evolution slapped over a classic “one last job” plot. –Danielle Burgos

With:

Nam June Paik

BYE BYE KIPLING

1986, 31 min, digital

A co-production of WNET with KBS/Seoul and TV Asahi/Tokyo, BYE BYE KIPLING unites Seoul, Tokyo, and NYC in joyful cacophony as Paik mounts a chaotic rebuttal to Rudyard Kipling’s “The Ballad of East and West.” A flitting butterfly is a proper opener for this rapid-fire series of twin gags, “jam sessions,” and layered video art, every frame a delightful mélange. To give just one example: elephants delicately step over human trainers to a live Philip Glass performance before cutting to Keith Haring interrupting Dick Cavett to say hi to Issey Miyake as Japanese marathon runner Takeyuki Nakayama sprints picture-in-picture breaking his own record in Seoul. The ambition of Paik in bringing together all his artistic family through innovation is a joy to behold, the best and most optimistic use of technology. –Danielle Burgos

Friday 6, March

Sunday 8, March

Thursday 12, March

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Keep Singing

Keep Singing

by Jonas Mekas

2011, 82 min, digital

Occasionally I join my music friends Dalius Naujo and Kenny Wollesen at Zebulon, a French music bistro in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. They are great musicians and I am happy to improvise with them, as a vocalist, we always have great time. So here are six pieces from our work together, documenting rehearsals and performances.

Monday 30, March

Love Affair, or The Case of the Missing Switchboar

Love Affair, or The Case of the Missing Switchboar

by Dušan Makavejev

In Serbo-Croatian and German with English subtitles. Print provided courtesy of Facets Multimedia., 1967, 70 min, 35mm

(LJUBAVNI SLUČAJ ILI TRAGEDIJA SLUŽBENICE P.T.T.)

With this film Makavejev introduced an original method of montage, inspired in part by his collaboration with the influential cineaste Branko Vučićević. Makavejev enjoyed worldwide acclaim for the first time with this breakout work. Starring Eva Ras as the aforementioned switchboard operator, who becomes embroiled in a doomed love affair.

Friday 28, February

Wednesday 4, March

Saturday 7, March

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Maggots and Men

Maggots and Men

by Cary Cronenwett

2009, 55 min, 16mm-to-digital

Set in a mythologized, post-revolutionary Russia, MAGGOTS AND MEN re-imagines the story of the 1921 uprising of the Kronstadt sailors with a twist of gender anarchy. Agit-prop theater group, Blue Blouse, guides the viewer through the story, which is narrated by fictionalized letters written by Stepan Petrichenko, the leader of the Provisional Revolutionary Committee.

“In drawing a parallel between the history of revolution and the free expression of gender, MAGGOTS AND MEN evokes the poignant sense that our present world is haunted by radical potentials that have yet to be fulfilled.” –Susan Stryker

CARY CRONENWETT IN PERSON!

Saturday 14, March

Double Feature
Maggots and Men + Peace of Mind Maggots and Men + Peace of Mind

Maggots and Men + Peace of Mind

CARY CRONENWETT IN PERSON!

Cary Cronenwett

MAGGOTS AND MEN

2009, 55 min, 16mm-to-digital

Set in a mythologized, post-revolutionary Russia, MAGGOTS AND MEN re-imagines the story of the 1921 uprising of the Kronstadt sailors with a twist of gender anarchy. Agit-prop theater group, Blue Blouse, guides the viewer through the story, which is narrated by fictionalized letters written by Stepan Petrichenko, the leader of the Provisional Revolutionary Committee.

“In drawing a parallel between the history of revolution and the free expression of gender, MAGGOTS AND MEN evokes the poignant sense that our present world is haunted by radical potentials that have yet to be fulfilled.” –Susan Stryker

Cary Cronenwett

PEACE OF MIND

2015, 76 min, digital

PEACE OF MIND documents the life of American artist, Flo McGarrell, prior to his untimely death in the earthquake that struck Haiti in January of 2010. Through interviews, local artists discuss McGarrell’s impact on the community and the small queer movement that was instigated around the FOSAJ Art Center in Jacmel where he worked. Cronenwett was a collaborative partner of McGarrell’s; prior to the tragedy, Cronenwett, McGarrell, and (producer) L.A. Teodosio were in the process of developing a film based on Kathy Acker’s novel, KATHY GOES TO HAITI. Shot only weeks before McGarrell’s death, with Zackary Drucker playing Kathy Acker, the footage from the unfinished project blurs the line between fiction and documentary.

Friday 13, March

Man is Not a Bird

Man is Not a Bird

by Dušan Makavejev

In Serbo-Croatian with English subtitles, 1965, 81 min, 35mm. Print courtesy of the British Film Institute.

(ČOVEK NIJE TICA)

The debut feature by Makavejev, MAN IS NOT A BIRD caught most critics off guard in both Yugoslavia and beyond. In 1965 the New Film phase in Yugoslav cinema was just cresting, and many young and talented directors were making their debuts. Makavejev’s unique sense of humor is immediately apparent in this film, as are his affinity for cinematic attractions, his frank exploration of sexual content, and his concern with the status of the working class. Starring the recently-deceased legendary Yugoslav screen diva Milena Dravić.

Friday 28, February

Tuesday 3, March

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Manifesto

Manifesto

by Dušan Makavejev

1988, 96 min, 35mm

For MANIFESTO, Makavejev adaptated a short story by Emile Zola. In the 1920s, in a small European country, the king is visiting a quiet village. Revolutionaries and the secret police face each other in this darkly humorous erotic-political allegory, made with an international cast including Camilla Søeberg, Alfred Molina, Rade Šerbedžija, Simon Callow, and Eric Stoltz.

Sunday 1, March

Friday 6, March

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Montenegro, or Pigs and Pearls

Montenegro, or Pigs and Pearls

by Dušan Makavejev

In English and Swedish with English subtitles, 1981, 96 min, 35mm. Archival print courtesy of the Moving Image Archive, University of North Carolina School of the Arts.

A bored American housewife living in Sweden enters the surreal underground culture of East European immigrant workers. In this darkly comedic critique of bourgeois alienation, Makavejev makes us search for human liberation in the jumble of excess that includes (but is not limited to) free love, shovel fighting, nightclubbing, caring for animals, and (not) eating poisoned food. A Swedish production, it stars Susan Anspach, Erland Josephson, Bora Todorović, and Svetozar Cvetković.

Sunday 1, March

Friday 6, March

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Newfilmmakers

Newfilmmakers

For full program listings, visit www.newfilmmakers.com.

NYWIFT: American Poet Tato Laviera

NYWIFT: American Poet Tato Laviera

The NYWIFT Member Screening series is NYWIFT’s most important community and visibility opportunity for member artists. Showcasing new and rarely screened films featuring NYWIFT members in a key creative role, the program includes a public screening of the film, followed by a post-show Q&A and a reception with the artists.

NYWIFT programs, screenings, and events are supported, in part, by grants from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

Sini Anderson (NYWIFT Member)

CATHERINE OPIE B.1961

2018, 15 min, DCP

A revealing and intimate portrait of artist Catherine Opie. Whether documenting San Francisco’s queer and gender-expansive communities during the AIDS crisis, Texas’s love affair with high school football, or Opie’s own devastatingly honest portraits of her body and life as a lesbian mother, each piece comes together to create a compelling profile, enhanced by the artist’s own revealing insights into her motivations and creative process.

Vivian Hernandez Ortiz (NYWIFT Member)

AMERICAN POET TATO LAVIERA

2018, 58 min, digital

This film tells the story of a beloved Nuyorican poet, playwright, and activist from the Lower East Side. Laviera kept his ear to the ground and his eyes on the ever-changing cultural, social, and political landscape of NYC. By mixing Puerto Rican culture and language with that of the streets of Loisaida and El Barrio, he masterfully created a powerful and diverse body of work by publishing collections of original poems and producing impactful theatrical plays. His skillful use of language, weaving Spanish, English, and Spanglish in his poems, addresses cultural identity, race, and the sense of alienation – of not feeling accepted ni aqui, ni alla (neither here nor there) in one’s adopted land or native homeland.

Total running time: ca. 75 min.

Tuesday 24, March

NYWIFT: Pennhurst

NYWIFT: Pennhurst

The NYWIFT Member Screening series is NYWIFT’s most important community and visibility opportunity for member artists. Showcasing new and rarely screened films featuring NYWIFT members in a key creative role, the program includes a public screening of the film, followed by a post-show Q&A and a reception with the artists.

NYWIFT programs, screenings, and events are supported, in part, by grants from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

Jodie Alexandra Taylor (NYWIFT Member)

PENNHURST

2018, 82 min, DCP

PENNHURST is a story of segregation, abandonment, and the meaning of home as told by the people that lived in, worked at, and crusaded for one of the largest and oldest Intellectual and Developmental Disability Institutions in the U.S. The facility, in its closing, challenged society’s perception of those with intellectual disabilities and ultimately fought for better rights – rights that are still being fought for today.

Tuesday 25, February

Queer Genius

Queer Genius

by Chet Pancake

2019, 114 min, digital

QUEER GENIUS is a cinematic exploration of four visionary queer artists transcending traditional narratives in their lives, their art, their identities, and their definitions of genius. The film features intertwined portraits of Barbara Hammer, Eileen Myles, Black Quantum Futurism, and Jibz Cameron, breaking down barriers in their creative fields as they confront fame, failure, censorship, family, gender, and sexuality. The communal possibilities of “genius” are embraced from a particularly queer perspective, crossing genres and generational perspectives.

CHET PANCAKE, WITH SPECIAL GUEST ARTISTS IN PERSON!

Saturday 14, March

Sunday 15, March

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RE: Maciunas and Fluxus

RE: Maciunas and Fluxus

by Jonas Mekas

2011, 93 min, digital

“Drawing on his personal archives, Mekas has assembled a Fluxus vaudeville starring Yoko Ono, Joseph Beuys, and the late Nam June Paik. Most of the material is relatively recent although Ben Vautieur shows some early 1960s work to hilarious effect and Mekas channels Fluxus founder George Maciunas throughout.” –J. Hoberman, VILLAGE VOICE

Monday 16, March

Strange Days

Strange Days

by Kathryn Bigelow

1995, 146 min, 35mm

With Ralph Fiennes, Angela Bassett, Juliette Lewis, Tom Sizemore, and Vincent D’Onofrio.

Before Kathryn Bigelow made war movies, she directed several odd and enjoyable films. STRANGE DAYS finds her working from James Cameron’s story of the final hours of the 20th century, in which Los Angeles is on fire, but not like it is now. Ralph Fiennes is Lenny Nero, a pornographer with a heart, “the finest cop to ever get thrown off the vice squad.” He deals in raw recordings of human experience captured to MiniDisc via headsets that can fit discreetly under a wig. Lenny has a strict “smut not snuff” policy, but a mysterious “blackjack” clip of a rape and murder leads back to Faith Justin (Juliette Lewis), an ex he continues to harass. Soon he and “Mace” Mason (Angela Bassett), his over-accommodating friend, are mixed up in the assassination of the rapper and activist Jeriko One. Minutes before midnight, Bassett holds a “lightning bolt from God” in her hand and wonders if it’s time for a war, but this film never loses its faith in police accountability. Images of cops charging into the subway with their guns drawn will be familiar, while an answering machine that does live transcription shows us a future that never was. –Maxwell Paparella

With:

Max Almy LEAVING THE 20TH CENTURY (1982, 10 min, digital)

Though most of her works focus on the present, Almy’s tripartate future is a vision of technology compounding human misunderstanding. Increased means of communication and access to information leave us more isolated than ever, and clinging more tightly to the very technology that caused it. In “Countdown,” pervasive news becomes unintelligible gibberish, the signal-to-noise ratio drowned in a sea of unprocessed information. “Departure” implies commute, but means emotional, then physical separation, as everything becomes negation – no lines, no society, and, ultimately, no future. “Arrival” describes the brave new world beyond the 20th century, a flat non-space where all problems were solved “in a very simple way”: there’s nothing to discern. Flattened, garbled, glitching, and fading, Almy’s characters inherit all the problems of tech along with their desired dehumanization. –Danielle Burgos

Saturday 7, March

Sunday 8, March

Wednesday 11, March

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Sweet Movie

Sweet Movie

by Dušan Makavejev

In English, French, Polish, Spanish, and Italian with English subtitles, 1974, 98 min, 35mm. Archival print courtesy of the Swedish Film Institute.

This is Makavejev’s film maudit, an extravagant and extremely provocative treatise on sex and politics that tips overboard into a grotesque mixture of carnival and ominous realism. Made in English as a coproduction between France, West Germany, and Canada, and starring Carole Laure in a picaresque role that pushed her to emotional and physical limits, it also features Anna Prucnal, Pierre Clementi, Sami Frey, and the notorious Vienna Actionist Otto Muehl in one of the more unsettling scenes ever captured on film.

Saturday 29, February

Wednesday 4, March

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The Coca-Cola Kid

The Coca-Cola Kid

by Dušan Makavejev

1985, 98 min, 35mm

Not many narrative filmmakers can boast that they have satirized the hegemonic corporate mentality by directly taking on none other than the Coca-Cola company. In this melodramatic comedy, produced in Australia and starring Eric Roberts and Greta Scacchi, Makavejev takes aim at branding, marketing campaigns, and Santa Claus’s complicity in this corporate charade.

Sunday 1, March

Thursday 5, March

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The Net

The Net

by Irwin Winkler

1995, 114 min, 35mm

With Sandra Bullock, Jeremy Northam, and Dennis Miller.

Following her breakout role in SPEED, Sandra Bullock was given her first solo top billing in this Hitchcockian digital yarn about Angela Bennett, a systems analyst who becomes enmeshed in a computer conspiracy involving shadowy cyberterrorists and a backdoor into security software used by the Department of Defense. Once the hackers erase Bennett’s identity – linking her social security number, criminal history, and bank records to a wanted woman – Bennett is forced to go on the run while attempting to recover her name and expose the crypto-conspirators. In retrospect, THE NET is at once prescient, hopelessly dated, and surprisingly entertaining. It’s one of the first films to pray on the anxieties of remote anonymized harassment while exposing the fragility of identity in the networked age. But if you think that sounds existential, just wait until you see Bullock in her oversized boyfriend flannel in front of her computer ordering late night dinner for one off Pizza.Net. Who among us? –Jon Dieringer

With:

Faith Holland SCREEN FLICKER (2012, 2 min, digital)

“SCREEN FLICKER re-stages the flatness of the computer screen, in direct opposition to the tunnels of cyberspace. Screens naturally flicker, at a rate too quick for our eyes to perceive but one that can be captured by a camera. This video confuses the medium of the computer screen with that of film, employing the classic avant-garde film strategy of flicker.” –Faith Holland

Faith Holland RIP GEOCITIES (2014, 3 min, digital)

“As though on a rollercoaster at an amusement park, RIP GEOCITIES is a ride through what Hollywood envisioned as cyberspace in the 1990s. Geocities, a website that hosted personal homepages for free, was a locus of creative Internet energy in the 1990s. This video abstractly represents and mourns the loss of not only the Geocities website, but also the culture it engendered, teeming with polyphonic, hand-coded web presences.” –Faith Holland

Thursday 5, March

Monday 9, March

Tuesday 10, March

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The Sky of the Centaur

The Sky of the Centaur

by Hugo Santiago

Argentina/France, in Spanish and French with English subtitles, 2015, 93 min, digital

(EL CIELO DEL CENTAURO)

The ship moors at dawn in Buenos Aires, from where it will sail again the next day. The Engineer goes down to the city to honor his father’s request: deliver a small package to one of his friends, Victor Zagros. When the package is taken away from him the Engineer embarks on a wild and dizzying quest, within a city, a sort of “wonder box” that little by little seems out of this world. The last film by the great Hugo Santiago (INVASIÓN, LES AUTRES), SKY OF THE CENTAUR was written in collaboration with Mariano Llinás, edited by Alejo Moguillansky, and features performances by Malik Zidi and Romina Paula.

“Geometry is of great importance in my cinema. And this film is built as a geometric theorem. The engineer works himself very well with the maps, marks the route that allows him to quickly visualize each site of the city. And with them he discovers every stage of that succession of events that is the path of the film itself.” –Hugo Santiago

Monday 9, March

The Witch

The Witch

by Robert Eggers

2015, 93 min, DCP

“Nathaniel Hawthorne’s 1835 short story ‘Young Goodman Brown’ pit a pious gent against a malevolent figure in the woods, throwing shade at the Salem Witch trials and good ol’ American hysteria in the process. Now along comes Robert Eggers’s Sundance-coronated ‘New England Folktale’ to take up the Puritan-horror mantle, stripping Hawthorne’s narrative for spare parts in order to fashion a stunning, straight-faced take on supernatural dread, 17th-century style. You do not need a metaphor about our nation’s loss of innocence to channel the chilling sense that something wicked this way comes. You just need a girl, a crone, and a black goat. […] Drawn, per a disclaimer, from period accounts of strange phenomena and psychotic breaks among settlers, Eggers’s impeccably crafted, historically accurate creepshow wears its deep-dive research on its tattered gingham sleeves. […] What this young filmmaker wants is to channel an olde-school notion of horror, one that harkens back to an age not just of pre-Revolutionary folktales but of Grimm fairy tales – in which voluptuous women in red cloaks tempt young men, and cursed beasts named Black Philip beckon with cloven hooves.” –David Fear, FILM COMMENT

Thursday 20, February

The Wolf House

The Wolf House

by Cristóbal León & Joaquín Cociña

In Spanish & German with English subtitles, 2018, 73 min, DCP

(LA CASA LOBO)

U.S. THEATRICAL PREMIERE RUN! Distributed by KimStim.

Loosely based on the grim case of Colonia Dignidad, a German émigré-run colony in post-WWII Chile that was revealed to have been used to imprison, torture, and murder dissidents during the Pinochet regime, THE WOLF HOUSE is an animated feature film with a much darker foundation than most. As deeply disturbing as its inspiration would suggest, it is also a truly inspired feat of animation, its extraordinary craft and artistic vision fusing with its profoundly sinister themes to create an experience of exceptional power.

Using stop-motion animation to unfurl a never-ending series of transformations that play out as a single sequence shot, Cristóbal León and Joaquín Cociña – making their first feature after a series of shorts – tell the grim fairy tale of Maria, a young woman who finds refuge in a house in the south of Chile after escaping from a sect of German religious fanatics. She is welcomed into the home by two pigs, the only inhabitants of the place. As in a dream, the universe of the house reacts to Maria’s feelings. The animals transform slowly into humans and the house becomes a nightmarish world.

Painstakingly produced over the course of several years, and filmed piecemeal within art galleries across several countries, in full view of the gallery-going public, THE WOLF HOUSE masquerades as an animated fairy tale produced by the leader of the sect in order to indoctrinate its followers. It’s easily one of the most accomplished, transporting, and conceptually rich animated features to appear in recent memory.

“It’s commonplace that folk and fairy tales have their dark sides, but they don’t come much darker than in THE WOLF HOUSE. Fusing Grimm, the early shorts of David Lynch and the stop-motion work of Jan Svankmajer into a visually engrossing, reference-rich and disturbing tale about the mental delirium of a young girl, the deeply uncanny film makes for an unsettling viewing experience, a creative tour de force whose endlessly fascinating visuals are deliberately seductive and repellent in equal measure.” –Jonathan Holland, HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

Friday 20, March

Monday 23, March

Tuesday 24, March

Wednesday 25, March

Thursday 26, March

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Virtuosity

Virtuosity

by Brett Leonard

1995, 106 min, 35mm. Archival print courtesy of the Deutsche Kinemathek.

With Denzel Washington, Kelly Lynch, and Russell Crowe.

THE LAWNMOWER MAN-director Brett Leonard continued his CGI-heavy investigations into the unholy marriage of man and machine with VIRTUOSITY, in which the disk image of history’s most sadistic serial killers – created for an ill-advised police training program – escapes from his virtual realm into our physical world with a cry of “Gravity!” This villainous anthropomorphized shitpost is portrayed with rubbery deviance by Russell Crowe, who draws easy comparisons to Jim Carrey’s performance in THE MASK. Crowe’s SID 6.7 cackles, flies through the air, eats shards of glass by the handful, and, in the film’s best scene, predicts the DAWs of the future by live-sampling and remixing the terrified screams of his nightclub hostages. Incarcerated ex-cop Parker Barnes (Denzel Washington in stone-faced detective mode) is deemed the only one who can bring SID to justice, as SID’s personas include that of the “political terrorist” who murdered Barnes’s family. Nilo Rodis-Jamero, who also served as production designer on JOHNNY MNEMONIC (also included in our series), creates a lurid and loud future-’95 that echoes the one in STRANGE DAYS, and Autodesk software more than earns its special thanks credit. –Mark Lukenbill

With:

Jon Rafman LEGENDARY REALITY (2017, 16 min, digital)

Jon Rafman has been leading forays into the most vulnerable valleys of the uncanny ever since the virality of his 9-EYES Google Street View project. His work utilizes images from video games and internet subcultures; he roots around in these images to find their most human aspects. The funereal LEGENDARY REALITY uses images from both gaming and physical landscapes but plasters them all with streaks of saturated pixels until it is unclear what’s real and what’s animated. Rafman’s meditative, downbeat narration draws on Leonard Cohen’s works, weaving through impressionist, BLADE RUNNER-specked dreams and memories. –Mark Lukenbill

Friday 6, March

Sunday 8, March

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Woubi Chéri

Woubi Chéri

by Philip Brooks & Laurent Bocahut

In French with English subtitles, 1998, 62 min, digital

WOUBI CHÉRI is recognized as the first film to give African homosexuals a chance to describe their world in their own words. The main characters of Abidjan’s woubi community begin the film with a vocabulary lesson: a woubi is a male who chooses to play the role of “wife” in a relationship with another man; a yossi is a bisexual man, perhaps married, who accepts the role of a woubi’s husband; a toussou bakari is a lesbian; controus are homophobes who oppose the woubia lifestyle. The self-described transvestites once called themselves “bats” because they hid together during the day and came out only at night. Even now, Tatiana says, “It’s not easy for us to go out in the daytime. Without the right to be different, Africa is going nowhere.” Barbara, a glamorous, more mature transvestite, was the leader of the tight-knit group and President of the Ivory Coast Transvestites Association. Laurent recalls this community was like a new family. “Your real family was the one you created. Nobody had to hide anything.”

PRESENTED IN PERSON BY NATHALIE ETOKE ON SUN, MAR 15!

Sunday 15, March

Tuesday 17, March

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WR: Mysteries of the Organism

WR: Mysteries of the Organism

by Dušan Makavejev

In Serbo-Croatian, English, Russian, and German with English subtitles, 1971, 84 min, 35mm

(W.R. – MISTERIJE ORGANIZMA)

With this film, widely regarded as Makavejev’s masterpiece, his inventive editing strategies fully blossomed into a wide-ranging, multi-channel exploration of the life and theories of the psychoanalyst Wilhelm Reich, and the intertwinement of sexual and political repression and liberation in the Cold War era in Yugoslavia, the United States, and the Soviet Union. Part documentary, part fiction, this subversive film occupies a unique place in the history of radical political cinema in general, and of post-Eisensteinian dialectical montage in particular. Starring Milena Dravić, Ivica Vidović, Tuli Kupferberg, and Jackie Curtis.

Wednesday 26, February

Saturday 29, February

Sunday 8, March

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