Show Times

Thursday 19, July

Becoming Who I Was

Becoming Who I Was

TBC

After a Buddhist boy in the highlands of northern India discovers that he is the reincarnation of a centuries-old Tibetan monk, his godfather takes him on a journey to discover his past.

Thursday 19, July

Final Portrait

Final Portrait

Rfor language, some sexual references and nudity.

In 1964, while on a short trip to Paris, the American writer and art-lover James Lord (Armie Hammer) is asked by his friend, the world-renowned artist Alberto Giacometti (Geoffrey Rush), to sit for a portrait. The process, Giacometti assures Lord, will take only a few days. Flattered and intrigued, Lord agrees. So begins not only the story of an offbeat friendship, but, seen through the eyes of Lord, an insight into the beauty, frustration, profundity and, at times, downright chaos of the artistic process. FINAL PORTRAIT is a portrait of a genius, and of a friendship between two men who are utterly different, yet increasingly bonded through a single, ever-evolving act of creativity. It is a film which shines a light on the artistic process itself, by turns exhilarating, exasperating and bewildering, questioning whether the gift of a great artist is a blessing or a curse.

Thursday 19, July

Friday 20, July

Quai des Orfèvres

Quai des Orfèvres

NR

When the sleazy movie financier who has been pursuing nightclub performer Jenny Lamour (Suzy Delair) turns up dead, her jealous husband (Bernard Blier) is the prime suspect in Inspector Antoine's (Louis Jouvet) investigation for the Quai des Orfèvres, France's Scotland Yard.

Friday 20, July

Saturday 21, July

Hellfire

Hellfire

Filmmaker Gina Telaroli, who works as Martin Scorsese’s video archivist, was a consultant on the recent film series “Martin Scorsese Presents Republic Rediscovered: New Restorations from Paramount Pictures,” which debuted in February at the Museum of Modern Art. She also cut the series trailer. Tonight Telaroli returns to her hometown to kick off our five-film Republic salute and introduce one of her favorite films from the MoMA retrospective. Hellfire is an unusual B western that was shot in two-strip Trucolor (a bargain-basement process heavy on oranges and blues). It tells of a reformed bad guy who pledges to build a church in honor of a self-sacrificing preacher he meets one day. William (“Wild Bill”) Elliott, Marie Windsor, and Forrest Tucker star. Cleveland revival premiere. DCP. 90 min.

Saturday 21, July

The Gunfighter

The Gunfighter

Gregory Peck plays a notorious gunfighter, weary of killing and of all the young punks who continually challenge him, in this superb psychological western, one of the masterpieces of the genre. 35mm. 84 min. It will be preceded at 7:00 by Gena Telaroli’s 14-min. short film This Castle Keep (USA, 2016, DCP), shown at the 2017 New York Film Festival and partly inspired by The Gunfighter, among other films. Telaroli, who is also Martin Scorsese’s video archivist, will introduce both movies starting at 7:00.

Saturday 21, July

Revenge

Revenge

Rfor strong bloody gruesome violence, a rape, sexuality, graphic nudity, drug use and language

Never take your mistress on an annual guys' getaway, especially one devoted to hunting - a violent lesson for three wealthy married men.

Saturday 21, July

Sunday 22, July

Quai des Orfèvres

Quai des Orfèvres

NR

When the sleazy movie financier who has been pursuing nightclub performer Jenny Lamour (Suzy Delair) turns up dead, her jealous husband (Bernard Blier) is the prime suspect in Inspector Antoine's (Louis Jouvet) investigation for the Quai des Orfèvres, France's Scotland Yard.

Sunday 22, July

Final Portrait

Final Portrait

Rfor language, some sexual references and nudity.

In 1964, while on a short trip to Paris, the American writer and art-lover James Lord (Armie Hammer) is asked by his friend, the world-renowned artist Alberto Giacometti (Geoffrey Rush), to sit for a portrait. The process, Giacometti assures Lord, will take only a few days. Flattered and intrigued, Lord agrees. So begins not only the story of an offbeat friendship, but, seen through the eyes of Lord, an insight into the beauty, frustration, profundity and, at times, downright chaos of the artistic process. FINAL PORTRAIT is a portrait of a genius, and of a friendship between two men who are utterly different, yet increasingly bonded through a single, ever-evolving act of creativity. It is a film which shines a light on the artistic process itself, by turns exhilarating, exasperating and bewildering, questioning whether the gift of a great artist is a blessing or a curse.

Sunday 22, July

Becoming Who I Was

Becoming Who I Was

TBC

After a Buddhist boy in the highlands of northern India discovers that he is the reincarnation of a centuries-old Tibetan monk, his godfather takes him on a journey to discover his past.

Sunday 22, July

Thursday 26, July

Sweet Sweetback's Baadassss Song

Sweet Sweetback's Baadassss Song

Here’s a new restoration of the seminal movie that helped launch the whole blaxploitation craze, though it’s more of an independent art film than an exploitation movie. Melvin Van Peebles produced, wrote, directed, edited, scored, and starred in this angry, blistering, hallucinatory tale of a stud on the run after being accused of killing two corrupt cops. It’s dedicated “to all the Brothers and Sisters who have had enough of The Man.” No one under 18 admitted! Cleveland revival premiere. DCP. 97 min.

Thursday 26, July

Mrs. Hyde

Mrs. Hyde

Isabelle Huppert stars in this oddly comic variant on Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. A meek, ineffectual, disliked science teacher at a French vocational school catering to immigrant teens turns into a confident, empowered instructor—and a dangerous nocturnal creature—after she is struck by lightning. A 2017 New York Film Festival selection. With Romain Duris. “In addition to often being quite funny, Serge Bozon's feature is an exemplary film about pedagogy.”

Thursday 26, July

Friday 27, July

The Murderer Lives At Number 21

The Murderer Lives At Number 21

Clouzot’s first feature is a comic mystery-thriller in which a wry police detective (Pierre Fresnay) impersonates a pastor in order to ferret out a serial killer living in a boarding house full of eccentrics. Undistributed in the U.S., this classic will be shown in a copy imported from France. With Suzy Delair. Subtitles. DCP. 83 min.

Friday 27, July

One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest

One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest

Rebellious patient/prisoner Randle McMurphy (Jack Nicholson) goes head to head with strict, steely head nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) in this rousing, subversive classic set inside an Oregon mental institution. It became the first film to sweep the top five Academy Awards (best picture, director, actor, actress, screenplay) since 1934’s It Happened One Night. The great supporting cast includes Scatman Crothers, Danny DeVito, Brad Dourif, Christopher Lloyd, William Redfield, Will Sampson, and Vincent Schiavelli. From the novel by Ken Kesey

Friday 27, July

Saturday 28, July

The Red Pony

The Red Pony

Robert Mitchum, Myrna Loy, Louis Calhern, and Margaret Hamilton star in this color screen adaptation of John Steinbeck’s novella. Boasting a screenplay written by Steinbeck himself and a famous musical score composed by Aaron Copland, this sensitive movie tells of a California farm boy (Peter Miles) who escapes his unhappy home life by lavishing attention on a newborn colt. 89 min.

Saturday 28, July

One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest

One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest

Rebellious patient/prisoner Randle McMurphy (Jack Nicholson) goes head to head with strict, steely head nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) in this rousing, subversive classic set inside an Oregon mental institution. It became the first film to sweep the top five Academy Awards (best picture, director, actor, actress, screenplay) since 1934’s It Happened One Night. The great supporting cast includes Scatman Crothers, Danny DeVito, Brad Dourif, Christopher Lloyd, William Redfield, Will Sampson, and Vincent Schiavelli. From the novel by Ken Kesey

Saturday 28, July

Sweet Sweetback's Baadassss Song

Sweet Sweetback's Baadassss Song

Here’s a new restoration of the seminal movie that helped launch the whole blaxploitation craze, though it’s more of an independent art film than an exploitation movie. Melvin Van Peebles produced, wrote, directed, edited, scored, and starred in this angry, blistering, hallucinatory tale of a stud on the run after being accused of killing two corrupt cops. It’s dedicated “to all the Brothers and Sisters who have had enough of The Man.” No one under 18 admitted! Cleveland revival premiere. DCP. 97 min.

Saturday 28, July

Sunday 29, July

Mrs. Hyde

Mrs. Hyde

Isabelle Huppert stars in this oddly comic variant on Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. A meek, ineffectual, disliked science teacher at a French vocational school catering to immigrant teens turns into a confident, empowered instructor—and a dangerous nocturnal creature—after she is struck by lightning. A 2017 New York Film Festival selection. With Romain Duris. “In addition to often being quite funny, Serge Bozon's feature is an exemplary film about pedagogy.”

Sunday 29, July

Cold Water

Cold Water

NR

An acclaimed early work by Olivier Assayas that has long remained unavailable, the deeply felt coming-of-age drama Cold Water at long last makes its way to U.S. theaters. Drawing from his own youthful experiences, Assayas revisits the outskirts of Paris in the early 1970s, telling the story of teenage lovers Gilles (Cyprien Fouquet) and Christine (Virginie Ledoyen), whose open rebellion against family and society threatens to tear them apart, as Christine is sent to an institution by her parents and Gilles faces an uncertain future after running into trouble at school. With a rock soundtrack that vividly evokes the period, and provides the backdrop for one of the most memorable party sequences ever committed to film, Cold Water is a heartbreaking immersion into the emotional tumult of adolescence.

Sunday 29, July

The Murderer Lives At Number 21

The Murderer Lives At Number 21

Clouzot’s first feature is a comic mystery-thriller in which a wry police detective (Pierre Fresnay) impersonates a pastor in order to ferret out a serial killer living in a boarding house full of eccentrics. Undistributed in the U.S., this classic will be shown in a copy imported from France. With Suzy Delair. Subtitles. DCP. 83 min.

Sunday 29, July

Thursday 2, August

The Day After

The Day After

UN

South Korean Master Hong Sangsoo’s 21st feature as director, The Day After, is a mordantly comic tale of infidelity and mistaken identity. Book publisher Bongwan’s (Kwon Haehyo) marriage is on the rocks after his wife (Cho Yunhee) discovers the affair he’s been having with his assistant (Kim Saebyuk). Now that relationship is ending too and Bongwan’s new assistant, the sharp and sensitive Areum (Kim Minhee), on her first day in the office, is left to navigate the fallout of all the turnover in Bongwan’s life.

With its ingeniously destabilizing leaps through time and stark black and white cinematography, The Day After begins as a darkly hilarious story of a man embroiled in extramarital entanglements but soon shifts—in a way only Hong can manage—into a heartfelt portrayal of a young woman on a quest for spiritual fulfillment.

Thursday 2, August

Les Parents Terrible (The Storm Within)

Les Parents Terrible (The Storm Within)

Jean Marais and Josette Day, who played the two lovers in Cocteau’s Beauty and the Beast, reunited with the director two years later for this film version of a Cocteau stage play. The movie charts the emotional turmoil that ensues within a dysfunctional middle-class family when the son announces his intention to marry. His jealous mother (who harbors incestuous feelings for her child) is absolutely distraught—while his father is distressed that his own mistress is now his son’s betrothed. Cocteau foregoes exterior shots but still manages to turn a claustrophobic stage piece into pure cinema. “An astonishingly dynamic film…Melodrama of the highest order.” –Time Out Film Guide. Cleveland revival premiere. Subtitles. DCP. 105 min.

Thursday 2, August

Friday 3, August

The Guardians

The Guardians

RFor some violence and sexuality.

During the First World War, Hortense, a tireless worker, hired Francine, a young woman from public assistance, to help her because her own daughter Solange was reluctant to submit. Between Hortense and Francine, mutual respect and recognition are established from the outset. But to save the cohesion of her family, Hortense will have to sacrifice the young woman and pay the price ...

Friday 3, August

Saturday 4, August

Driftwood

Driftwood

The New Yorker calls this little known but fascinating and unusual movie an “electrifying, eccentric masterwork.” Young Natalie Wood plays a nine-year-old orphan who was raised by her preacher great-grandfather in a Western ghost town. She arrives in a different small town where her unfiltered outspokenness and sense of biblical morality upset the hypocritical locals. A collie and an epidemic heighten the drama. With Ruth Warrick, Walter Brennan, and Dean Jagger. Cleveland revival premiere. DCP. 88 min

Saturday 4, August

The Wages of Fear

The Wages of Fear

Yves Montand stars in this classic French thriller, one of the most suspenseful movies ever made! Set in a Central American petroleum republic, the film follows four down-on-their-luck drifters who take on a veritable suicide mission: driving two truckloads of volatile nitroglycerine across 300 miles of perilous mountain roads. Original, uncut version! Subtitles. 147 min

Saturday 4, August

Sorcerer

Sorcerer

Roy Scheider stars in William Friedkin’s big-budget reimagining of The Wages of Fear (see 8/4 at 6:50). Four desperate men of differing nationalities come together in South America to transport explosive nitroglycerine by truck across 300 miles of treacherous jungle roads. A huge critical and box office flop when first released, Friedkin’s follow-up to The Exorcist is now regarded by some as a masterpiece. (Friedkin himself ranks this nail-biter as one of his best movies.) Music by Tangerine Dream. Cleveland revival premiere. DCP. 121 min.

Saturday 4, August

Sunday 5, August

The Guardians

The Guardians

RFor some violence and sexuality.

During the First World War, Hortense, a tireless worker, hired Francine, a young woman from public assistance, to help her because her own daughter Solange was reluctant to submit. Between Hortense and Francine, mutual respect and recognition are established from the outset. But to save the cohesion of her family, Hortense will have to sacrifice the young woman and pay the price ...

Sunday 5, August

Les Parents Terrible (The Storm Within)

Les Parents Terrible (The Storm Within)

Jean Marais and Josette Day, who played the two lovers in Cocteau’s Beauty and the Beast, reunited with the director two years later for this film version of a Cocteau stage play. The movie charts the emotional turmoil that ensues within a dysfunctional middle-class family when the son announces his intention to marry. His jealous mother (who harbors incestuous feelings for her child) is absolutely distraught—while his father is distressed that his own mistress is now his son’s betrothed. Cocteau foregoes exterior shots but still manages to turn a claustrophobic stage piece into pure cinema. “An astonishingly dynamic film…Melodrama of the highest order.” –Time Out Film Guide. Cleveland revival premiere. Subtitles. DCP. 105 min.

Sunday 5, August

The Day After

The Day After

UN

South Korean Master Hong Sangsoo’s 21st feature as director, The Day After, is a mordantly comic tale of infidelity and mistaken identity. Book publisher Bongwan’s (Kwon Haehyo) marriage is on the rocks after his wife (Cho Yunhee) discovers the affair he’s been having with his assistant (Kim Saebyuk). Now that relationship is ending too and Bongwan’s new assistant, the sharp and sensitive Areum (Kim Minhee), on her first day in the office, is left to navigate the fallout of all the turnover in Bongwan’s life.

With its ingeniously destabilizing leaps through time and stark black and white cinematography, The Day After begins as a darkly hilarious story of a man embroiled in extramarital entanglements but soon shifts—in a way only Hong can manage—into a heartfelt portrayal of a young woman on a quest for spiritual fulfillment.

Sunday 5, August

Thursday 9, August

Sorcerer

Sorcerer

Roy Scheider stars in William Friedkin’s big-budget reimagining of The Wages of Fear (see 8/4 at 6:50). Four desperate men of differing nationalities come together in South America to transport explosive nitroglycerine by truck across 300 miles of treacherous jungle roads. A huge critical and box office flop when first released, Friedkin’s follow-up to The Exorcist is now regarded by some as a masterpiece. (Friedkin himself ranks this nail-biter as one of his best movies.) Music by Tangerine Dream. Cleveland revival premiere. DCP. 121 min.

Thursday 9, August

Saving Brinton

Saving Brinton

UN

In a farmhouse basement on the Iowa countryside, eccentric collector Mike Zahs makes a remarkable discovery: the showreels of the man who brought moving pictures to America’s Heartland. Among the treasures: rare footage of President Teddy Roosevelt, the first moving images from Burma, a lost relic from magical effects godfather Georges Méliés. These are the films that introduced movies to the world. And they didn’t end up in Iowa by accident. The old nitrate reels are just some of the artifacts that belonged to William Franklin Brinton. From thousands of trinkets, handwritten journals, receipts, posters and catalogs emerges the story of an inventive farmboy who became America’s greatest barnstorming movieman. As Mike uncovers this hidden legacy, he begins a journey to restore the Brinton name that takes us to The Library of Congress, Paris and back for a big screen extravaganza in the same small-town movie theater where Frank first turned on a projector over a century ago. By uniting community through a pride in their living history, Mike embodies a welcome antidote to the breakneck pace of our disposable society. "Saving Brinton" is a portrait of this unlikely Midwestern folk hero, at once a meditation on living simply and a celebration of dreaming big.

Thursday 9, August

Friday 10, August

Saving Brinton

Saving Brinton

UN

In a farmhouse basement on the Iowa countryside, eccentric collector Mike Zahs makes a remarkable discovery: the showreels of the man who brought moving pictures to America’s Heartland. Among the treasures: rare footage of President Teddy Roosevelt, the first moving images from Burma, a lost relic from magical effects godfather Georges Méliés. These are the films that introduced movies to the world. And they didn’t end up in Iowa by accident. The old nitrate reels are just some of the artifacts that belonged to William Franklin Brinton. From thousands of trinkets, handwritten journals, receipts, posters and catalogs emerges the story of an inventive farmboy who became America’s greatest barnstorming movieman. As Mike uncovers this hidden legacy, he begins a journey to restore the Brinton name that takes us to The Library of Congress, Paris and back for a big screen extravaganza in the same small-town movie theater where Frank first turned on a projector over a century ago. By uniting community through a pride in their living history, Mike embodies a welcome antidote to the breakneck pace of our disposable society. "Saving Brinton" is a portrait of this unlikely Midwestern folk hero, at once a meditation on living simply and a celebration of dreaming big.

Friday 10, August

That Summer

That Summer

NR

Welcome to Grey Gardens…as you’ve never seen it before. Three years before the Maysles’ landmark documentary introduced the world to Edith and Edie Beale—the unforgettable mother-daughter (and Jackie O. relatives) living in a decaying dream world on Long Island—renowned photographer Peter Beard chronicled life at their crumbling estate during one summer in 1972. For the first time ever, director Göran Olsson (The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975) assembles this long-lost footage—featuring glimpses of luminaries like Andy Warhol, Mick Jagger, and Truman Capote—into a one-of-a-kind family portrait bursting with the loving squabbles, quotable bon mots, and impromptu musical numbers that would make Big and Little Edie beloved cultural icons.

Friday 10, August

Saturday 11, August

Manon

Manon

Winner of the top prize at the 1949 Venice Film Festival, this Clouzot rarity transposes Abbé Prévost’s 1731 novel Manon Lescaut to post-WWII France. It tells of a French Resistance fighter (Michel Auclair) who rescues a young woman accused of being a Nazi collaborator (Cécile Aubry) from villagers who want to do her harm. Falling for her, he takes her to Paris. But there she is further tainted by her shady brother (Serge Reggiani). Subtitles. 100 min.

Saturday 11, August

The Smallest Show on Earth

The Smallest Show on Earth

The ticket seller is surly, the projectionist is tipsy, the shabby auditorium is a flea-pit, and business is lousy. If this sounds like the old Cinematheque, it isn’t. It’s the Bijou Kinema, a run-down British movie house newly inherited by a young couple (Virginia McKenna, Bill Travers) who have also inherited the cinema’s eccentric staff. (Projectionist Peter Sellers and box office worker Margaret Rutherford are among them.) Shall the new owners shutter the theater and sell the property to their main competitor? (He needs a parking lot for his modern Grand cinema.) Or try to make a go of it, against all odds? Don’t miss this delightful British comedy classic in a 35mm print imported from England. Preceded at 7:00 by Charles R. Bowers’ outrageous silent comedy Now You Tell One (USA, 1926, co-directed by Harold L. Muller, DCP), a largely forgotten screen gem. Total 102 min

Saturday 11, August

Tale of Cinema

Tale of Cinema

Undistributed theatrically in the U.S. until now, the celebrated sixth film by master South Korean moviemaker Hong Sang-soo integrates assorted characters and incidents—two men involved with the same woman, a night of drinking and failed sex, a suicide pact—into a surprising and sometimes disorienting narrative at once wry, moving, and profound. The less you know about this movie before you see it, the better. 100% critics rating on RottenTomatoes.com. “Has a sheer simplicity and clarity—plus an attractive underlying optimism—that could win [Hong] new friends on the international arthouse circuit.” –Variety

Saturday 11, August

Sunday 12, August

That Brennan Girl

That Brennan Girl

The opening night film in February’s “Republic Rediscovered” series at MoMA was this obscure but affecting tale of sin and redemption. The film focuses on an unloved teenager (Mona Freeman) who learns unhelpful life lessons from her prostitute mother before falling in with a charming con man (James Dunn) and growing up to be an unfit mother herself. Stylishly directed, this was the final movie by the underrated Alfred Santell. Cleveland revival premiere. DCP. 95 min.

Sunday 12, August

That Summer

That Summer

NR

Welcome to Grey Gardens…as you’ve never seen it before. Three years before the Maysles’ landmark documentary introduced the world to Edith and Edie Beale—the unforgettable mother-daughter (and Jackie O. relatives) living in a decaying dream world on Long Island—renowned photographer Peter Beard chronicled life at their crumbling estate during one summer in 1972. For the first time ever, director Göran Olsson (The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975) assembles this long-lost footage—featuring glimpses of luminaries like Andy Warhol, Mick Jagger, and Truman Capote—into a one-of-a-kind family portrait bursting with the loving squabbles, quotable bon mots, and impromptu musical numbers that would make Big and Little Edie beloved cultural icons.

Sunday 12, August

Tale of Cinema

Tale of Cinema

Undistributed theatrically in the U.S. until now, the celebrated sixth film by master South Korean moviemaker Hong Sang-soo integrates assorted characters and incidents—two men involved with the same woman, a night of drinking and failed sex, a suicide pact—into a surprising and sometimes disorienting narrative at once wry, moving, and profound. The less you know about this movie before you see it, the better. 100% critics rating on RottenTomatoes.com. “Has a sheer simplicity and clarity—plus an attractive underlying optimism—that could win [Hong] new friends on the international arthouse circuit.” –Variety

Sunday 12, August

Thursday 16, August

Henri-Georges Clouzot's Inferno

Henri-Georges Clouzot's Inferno

The story of a film that was never made, this fascinating documentary chronicles the ill-fated attempt by celebrated French director of The Wages of Fear and Diabolique to shoot a long-planned movie entitled Inferno during the 1960s. Starring Romy Schneider and Serge Reggiani, the movie, a tale of pathological jealousy, was going to incorporate some radical visual and sonic experiments worthy of the op-art era. Fortunately, among the 15 hours of footage that survive from this unrealized project are the shimmering, psychedelic color test reels featuring the 26-year-old (and sometimes nude) Schneider. Suplementing these dazzling screen tests are other rushes from the film—all unseen for decades—as well as interviews with surviving crew members (like Costa-Gavras) and reenactments of Inferno’s key scenes. Subtitles. DCP. 94 min.

Thursday 16, August

Ava

Ava

NR

Based on her own adolescent experiences, Sadaf Foroughi’s Ava is a gripping debut about a young girl’s coming-of-age in a strict, traditional society. Living with her well-to-do parents in Tehran, Ava is a bright and focused teen whose concerns — friendships, music, social status, academic performance — resemble that of nearly any teenager. When Ava’s mistrustful and overprotective mother questions her relationship with a boy — going so far as to visit a gynecologist — Ava is overwhelmed by a newfound rage. Formerly a model student, Ava begins to rebel against the strictures imposed by her parents, her school, and the society at large.

Thursday 16, August

Friday 17, August

Ava

Ava

NR

Based on her own adolescent experiences, Sadaf Foroughi’s Ava is a gripping debut about a young girl’s coming-of-age in a strict, traditional society. Living with her well-to-do parents in Tehran, Ava is a bright and focused teen whose concerns — friendships, music, social status, academic performance — resemble that of nearly any teenager. When Ava’s mistrustful and overprotective mother questions her relationship with a boy — going so far as to visit a gynecologist — Ava is overwhelmed by a newfound rage. Formerly a model student, Ava begins to rebel against the strictures imposed by her parents, her school, and the society at large.

Friday 17, August

Henri-Georges Clouzot's Inferno

Henri-Georges Clouzot's Inferno

The story of a film that was never made, this fascinating documentary chronicles the ill-fated attempt by celebrated French director of The Wages of Fear and Diabolique to shoot a long-planned movie entitled Inferno during the 1960s. Starring Romy Schneider and Serge Reggiani, the movie, a tale of pathological jealousy, was going to incorporate some radical visual and sonic experiments worthy of the op-art era. Fortunately, among the 15 hours of footage that survive from this unrealized project are the shimmering, psychedelic color test reels featuring the 26-year-old (and sometimes nude) Schneider. Suplementing these dazzling screen tests are other rushes from the film—all unseen for decades—as well as interviews with surviving crew members (like Costa-Gavras) and reenactments of Inferno’s key scenes. Subtitles. DCP. 94 min.

Friday 17, August

Saturday 18, August

I've Always Loved You

I've Always Loved You

We conclude our short Republic Pictures tribute with the most expensive film ever made by the studio up to its time. I’ve Always Loved You is a lavish romantic drama, fueled by the music of Rachmaninoff, Chopin, Beethoven, and others, about a promising Pennsylvania pianist (Catherine McLeod) who must choose between two men—her worldly, sophisticated concert pianist tutor (Philip Dorn) and a loyal family farmhand (William Carter) who has loved her for years. “With color by Technicolor, piano solos by Artur Rubinstein, and direction by A-lister Frank Borzage, Republic made a rare foray into high-budget filmmaking with this 1946 prestige production.” –MoMA. 35mm restored print courtesy of the UCLA Film & Television Archive. 117 min.

Saturday 18, August

En El Septimo Dia

En El Septimo Dia

The first theatrical feature in 13 years by the acclaimed director of such indie classics as Our Song and Girls Town focuses on a group of undocumented immigrant workers in Brooklyn, NY. These men work six days a week at a variety of low-level jobs and savor their weekly soccer game on Sunday. But a crisis arises when their team reaches the league finals and their captain and star, a bike delivery person, suddenly has to work on Sundays. “Revolving around friendships, the pleasures of summer sport and the nitty-gritty of jobs that seldom take center stage, it's a work of unforced charm, a neorealist marvel.” –Hollywood Reporter. Cleveland premiere. Subtitles. DCP. 97 min. www

Saturday 18, August

One Sings, the Other Doesn't

One Sings, the Other Doesn't

TBC

Agnés Varda’s enchanting ode to female friendship and liberation is part blissed-out bohemian musical, part revolutionary cri de cœur. Spanning more than a decade, it traces the ups and downs—abortion, heartbreak, marriage, motherhood—of two friends, Pauline (Mairesse) and Suzanne (Liotard). Even as their lives radically diverge, they remain steadfastly devoted to one another while finding ways to empower other women: one as a traveling feminist folk singer, the other as a reproductive rights activist. Set against France’s pro-choice struggle—of which Varda herself was on the frontlines—this tender and intimate epic celebrates the power of women to lift one another up.

Saturday 18, August

Sunday 19, August

One Sings, the Other Doesn't

One Sings, the Other Doesn't

TBC

Agnés Varda’s enchanting ode to female friendship and liberation is part blissed-out bohemian musical, part revolutionary cri de cœur. Spanning more than a decade, it traces the ups and downs—abortion, heartbreak, marriage, motherhood—of two friends, Pauline (Mairesse) and Suzanne (Liotard). Even as their lives radically diverge, they remain steadfastly devoted to one another while finding ways to empower other women: one as a traveling feminist folk singer, the other as a reproductive rights activist. Set against France’s pro-choice struggle—of which Varda herself was on the frontlines—this tender and intimate epic celebrates the power of women to lift one another up.

Sunday 19, August

The Lost One

The Lost One

The only film written and directed by Peter Lorre (who also stars) is a noir drama about a German scientist, working for the Nazis during WWII, who discovers that his lover has been selling his findings to the Allies. “Absolutely phenomenal.” –Time Out Film Guide. Subtitles. 98 min.

Sunday 19, August

En El Septimo Dia

En El Septimo Dia

The first theatrical feature in 13 years by the acclaimed director of such indie classics as Our Song and Girls Town focuses on a group of undocumented immigrant workers in Brooklyn, NY. These men work six days a week at a variety of low-level jobs and savor their weekly soccer game on Sunday. But a crisis arises when their team reaches the league finals and their captain and star, a bike delivery person, suddenly has to work on Sundays. “Revolving around friendships, the pleasures of summer sport and the nitty-gritty of jobs that seldom take center stage, it's a work of unforced charm, a neorealist marvel.” –Hollywood Reporter. Cleveland premiere. Subtitles. DCP. 97 min. www

Sunday 19, August

Saturday 25, August

Changes In The Village

Changes In The Village

In a career that spanned over 50 years and encompassed over 30 films, the late Sri Lankan filmmaker Lester James Peries established a Sinhalese cinema of international repute on a small island nation that resides in the shadow of a mighty, movie-producing neighbor, India. We have never shown a movie by this director who is frequently likened to Satyajit Ray, but that changes tonight with a rare screening of the film that first established Peries’ international reputation. Changes in the Village is a poetic family drama, spanning years, in which the daughter of a village chief is forced to marry a man she does not love. As usual with Peries, the family tensions mirror those of Sri Lankan society.

Saturday 25, August

The Third Murder

The Third Murder

NR

Leading attorney Shigemori takes on the defence of murder-robbery suspect Misumi who served jail time for another murder 30 years ago. Shigemori’s chances of winning the case seem low - his client freely admits his guilt, despite facing the death penalty if he is convicted. As he digs deeper into the case, as he hears the testimonies of the victim’s family and Misumi himself, the once confident Shigemori begins to doubt whether his client is the murderer after all.

Saturday 25, August

Wanda

Wanda

The only film written and directed by Elia Kazan’s wife Barbara Loden is a work of American neorealism and one of the great one-offs in cinema history. (Loden died from cancer before she could make a second movie.) Shot in 16mm, this unadorned indie classic also stars Loden as the timid, bedraggled title character—a divorced, destitute housewife from a Pennsylvania mining town. Prone to looking for love in all the wrong places, Wanda eventually hooks up with a small-time bank robber. “If there is a female counterpart to John Cassavetes, Barbara Loden is it.” –The New Yorker. Cleveland revival premiere.

Saturday 25, August

Sunday 26, August

La Verite (The Truth)

La Verite (The Truth)

Brigitte Bardot delivers her best performance in this Clouzot rarity. She plays Dominique, a modern, uninhibited young woman on trial for the murder of her sister’s fiancé who was also Dominique’s lover. Flashbacks re-create the events that led to this tragedy, and in time it becomes apparent that what’s really on trial is Dominique’s carefree, liberated, “immoral” lifestyle—a threat to the established social order. Cleveland revival premiere. Subtitles. DCP. 130 min

Sunday 26, August

Wanda

Wanda

The only film written and directed by Elia Kazan’s wife Barbara Loden is a work of American neorealism and one of the great one-offs in cinema history. (Loden died from cancer before she could make a second movie.) Shot in 16mm, this unadorned indie classic also stars Loden as the timid, bedraggled title character—a divorced, destitute housewife from a Pennsylvania mining town. Prone to looking for love in all the wrong places, Wanda eventually hooks up with a small-time bank robber. “If there is a female counterpart to John Cassavetes, Barbara Loden is it.” –The New Yorker. Cleveland revival premiere.

Sunday 26, August

The Third Murder

The Third Murder

NR

Leading attorney Shigemori takes on the defence of murder-robbery suspect Misumi who served jail time for another murder 30 years ago. Shigemori’s chances of winning the case seem low - his client freely admits his guilt, despite facing the death penalty if he is convicted. As he digs deeper into the case, as he hears the testimonies of the victim’s family and Misumi himself, the once confident Shigemori begins to doubt whether his client is the murderer after all.

Sunday 26, August

Thursday 30, August

The Scarlet Letter

The Scarlet Letter

Brigitte Bardot delivers her best performance in this Clouzot rarity. She plays Dominique, a modern, uninhibited young woman on trial for the murder of her sister’s fiancé who was also Dominique’s lover. Flashbacks re-create the events that led to this tragedy, and in time it becomes apparent that what’s really on trial is Dominique’s carefree, liberated, “immoral” lifestyle—a threat to the established social order. Cleveland revival premiere. Subtitles. DCP. 130 min

Thursday 30, August

Friday 31, August

Donna Haraway: Story Telling For Earthly Survival

Donna Haraway: Story Telling For Earthly Survival

Feminist thinker and science historian Donna Haraway breaks down the boundaries among humans, animals, and machines in her seminal works “A Cyborg Manifesto” and Primate Visions. This film captures Haraway in her hand-built California home, talking about her life, influences, and ideas, with topics ranging from capitalism, Catholicism, and colonialism to sex and marriage, sci-fi, and dogs. “An ode to this thinker’s expansive mind and life.” –Vice Magazine

Friday 31, August

2018 Sundance Film Festival Short Film Tour

2018 Sundance Film Festival Short Film Tour

NR

The 2018 Sundance Film Festival Short Film Tour is a 95-minute theatrical program of seven short films selected from this year’s Festival, widely considered the premier showcase for short films and the launchpad for many now-prominent independent filmmakers for more than 30 years. Including fiction, documentary and animation from around the world, the 2018 program offers new audiences a taste of what the Festival offers, from laugh-out-loud comedy to contemplative reflections of the world we live in.

Fueled by artistic expression and limited only by their runtime, short films transcend traditional storytelling. They are a significant and popular way artists can connect with audiences. From documentary to animation, narrative to experimental, the abbreviated form is made for risk-taking. The Festival has always treated short films with the highest regard and gives a home to both established and new

filmmakers with shorts for audiences to discover and celebrate.

The Festival's Short Film Program has long been established as a place to discover talented directors, such as past alums Damien Chazelle, Wes Anderson, Jill Soloway, Spike Jonze, Paul Thomas Anderson, Dee Rees, Taika Waititi, Trey Parker and Matt Stone, Lake Bell, Debra Granik, Jay and Mark Duplass, Todd Haynes, Lynne Ramsay, Andrea Arnold, and many others.

Program

Maude

U.S.A, 10 minutes. Written and directed by Anna Margaret Hollyman. Teeny thought it was just another routine babysitting job – until she's shocked to meet the client. As the day goes on, Teeny decides to become the woman she had no idea she always wanted to be...until she

gets caught.

Baby Brother

U.S.A., 14 minutes. Written and directed by Kamau Bilal.

The director's baby brother moves back in with his parents.

The Burden

Sweden, 14 minutes. Written and directed by Niki Lindroth vo n Bahr. A dark musical enacted in a modern shopping center, situated next to a large freeway. The employees of the various commercial venues deal with boredom and existential anxiety by performing cheerful musical turns. The apocalypse is a tempting liberator.

Hair Wolf

Short Film Jury Award: U.S. Fiction

U.S.A., 12 minutes. Written and directed by Mariama Diallo.

In a black hair salon in gentrifying Brooklyn, the local residents fend off a strange new monster: white women intent on sucking the lifeblood from black culture.

JEOM

U.S.A., South Korea, 4 minutes. Written and directed by Kangmin Kim.

A father and a son both have the same big birthmark on their butt. Believing that the two birthmarks are connected, the son scrubs his father's birthmark to remove it – but he just can't get rid of it.

Fauve

Short Film Special Jury Award

Canada, 16 minutes. Written and directed by Jérémy Comte.

Set in a surface mine, two boys sink into a seemingly innocent power game with Mother Nature as the sole observer.

Matria

Short Film Grand Jury Prize, Presented by YouTube Spain, 21 minutes. Written and directed by Álvaro Gago. Faced with a challenging daily routine, Ramona tries to take refuge in her relationships with her daughter and granddaughter.

Director Bios

Anna Margaret Hollyman ( Maude )

Anna Margaret Hollyman is an Austin-based actor, writer, and director. She has starred in films that have premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, SXSW Film Festival, Tribeca Film Festival, Cannes Film Festival, and Telluride Film Festival. She graduated from Sarah Lawrence College with a bachelor of arts in theatre arts and art history. She most recently starred in Don't Leave Home , a feature filmed in Ireland

by director Michael Tully. Maude is the first film she has written and directed.

Kamau Bilal ( Baby Brother )

Kamau is a filmmaker, film editor, and documentary director of photography working in Missouri. Recently he photographed the HBO-commissioned documentary Stories Women Tell (2016 Tribeca Film Festival), and as an editor he cut A Stray (2016 SXSW Film Festival). He directed Crown Candy , co-directed with David Wilson in 2016, and What Kind of Man . Baby Brother is his latest short. He teaches editing and cinematography classes at the University of Missouri in the School of Visual Studies.

Niki Lindroth von Bahr ( The Burden )

Niki Lindroth von Bahr is an artist and director based in Stockholm. Her films The Burden (2017), Bath House (2014), and Tord and Tord (2010) have been screened at the Cannes Film Festival and the Sundance Film Festival. Niki got her master's degree in fine art at the Royal Institute of Art in Stockholm. She is also a freelancing costume designer and has, together with Nicklas Nilsson, worked with artists like

Fever Ray and David Bowie.

Mariama Diallo ( Hair Wolf )

Mariama Diallo is a Senegalese American writer and filmmaker based in Brooklyn. In 2015 Mariama co-wrote Everybody Dies! , which was directed by Frances Bodomo and formed part of the feature film Collective: Unconscious premiering at 2016's SXSW Film Festival. In 2016 she wrote and directed the short film Sketch , which had its world premiere at the New York African Film Festival and won the FOX Inclusion Emerging Voices Award at the BlackStar Film Festival.

Kangmin Kim ( JEOM )

Kangmin Kim, co-founder of Studio Zazac, is an award-winning Korean filmmaker and designer based in Los Angeles. His films have screened internationally at several festivals including the Sundance Film Festival, Annecy International Animated Film Festival, Ottawa International Animation Festival, AFI Fest, and more. His latest film, Deer Flower , premiered at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival and won the best animated short award at Aspen Shortsfest, as well as other awards.

Jérémy Comte ( Fauve )

Driven by a passion for skateboarding, Jeremy Comte directed his first short documentary, Feel The Hill , at eighteen years old, landing him a world tour with the Banff Mountain Film Festival. Raised in the countryside and later graduating from Concordia University in film production, his connection with nature and curiosity for the human condition deepened with his travels around the globe. Comte is roused by psychological, raw narratives finding meaningful connections through poetic imagery.

Álvaro Gago ( Matria )

Álvaro Gago graduated in audiovisual communication and music in Spain and studied theatre in Chicago and filmmaking in London. His first two short films, Curricán and Bombolles , played and won awards at several film festivals. His most recent short film, Matria , premiered at Valladolid International Film Festival, winning best national film. Currently, he is editing Trote , Xacio Baño’s first feature film, as well as developing both his next short film and first feature film script.

Friday 31, August

Saturday 1, September

The Mystery of Picasso

The Mystery of Picasso

Pablo Picasso paints on “transparent” canvases (so we, positioned behind the works, can watch them take shape, almost like animation) in this unique art film that amply demonstrates the great artist’s fluid technique and fertile imagination. (He also talks about his work.) The 15 pictures Picasso creates during this movie were destroyed after the filming, so they now exist only in this documentary. Though a departure for director Clouzot, The Mystery of Picasso remains “one of the most joyful of all records of an artist at work,” according to critic Pauline Kael. Color cinematography by Claude Renoir, Pierre Auguste’s grandson. Subtitles. 75 min.

Saturday 1, September

2018 Sundance Film Festival Short Film Tour

2018 Sundance Film Festival Short Film Tour

NR

The 2018 Sundance Film Festival Short Film Tour is a 95-minute theatrical program of seven short films selected from this year’s Festival, widely considered the premier showcase for short films and the launchpad for many now-prominent independent filmmakers for more than 30 years. Including fiction, documentary and animation from around the world, the 2018 program offers new audiences a taste of what the Festival offers, from laugh-out-loud comedy to contemplative reflections of the world we live in.

Fueled by artistic expression and limited only by their runtime, short films transcend traditional storytelling. They are a significant and popular way artists can connect with audiences. From documentary to animation, narrative to experimental, the abbreviated form is made for risk-taking. The Festival has always treated short films with the highest regard and gives a home to both established and new

filmmakers with shorts for audiences to discover and celebrate.

The Festival's Short Film Program has long been established as a place to discover talented directors, such as past alums Damien Chazelle, Wes Anderson, Jill Soloway, Spike Jonze, Paul Thomas Anderson, Dee Rees, Taika Waititi, Trey Parker and Matt Stone, Lake Bell, Debra Granik, Jay and Mark Duplass, Todd Haynes, Lynne Ramsay, Andrea Arnold, and many others.

Program

Maude

U.S.A, 10 minutes. Written and directed by Anna Margaret Hollyman. Teeny thought it was just another routine babysitting job – until she's shocked to meet the client. As the day goes on, Teeny decides to become the woman she had no idea she always wanted to be...until she

gets caught.

Baby Brother

U.S.A., 14 minutes. Written and directed by Kamau Bilal.

The director's baby brother moves back in with his parents.

The Burden

Sweden, 14 minutes. Written and directed by Niki Lindroth vo n Bahr. A dark musical enacted in a modern shopping center, situated next to a large freeway. The employees of the various commercial venues deal with boredom and existential anxiety by performing cheerful musical turns. The apocalypse is a tempting liberator.

Hair Wolf

Short Film Jury Award: U.S. Fiction

U.S.A., 12 minutes. Written and directed by Mariama Diallo.

In a black hair salon in gentrifying Brooklyn, the local residents fend off a strange new monster: white women intent on sucking the lifeblood from black culture.

JEOM

U.S.A., South Korea, 4 minutes. Written and directed by Kangmin Kim.

A father and a son both have the same big birthmark on their butt. Believing that the two birthmarks are connected, the son scrubs his father's birthmark to remove it – but he just can't get rid of it.

Fauve

Short Film Special Jury Award

Canada, 16 minutes. Written and directed by Jérémy Comte.

Set in a surface mine, two boys sink into a seemingly innocent power game with Mother Nature as the sole observer.

Matria

Short Film Grand Jury Prize, Presented by YouTube Spain, 21 minutes. Written and directed by Álvaro Gago. Faced with a challenging daily routine, Ramona tries to take refuge in her relationships with her daughter and granddaughter.

Director Bios

Anna Margaret Hollyman ( Maude )

Anna Margaret Hollyman is an Austin-based actor, writer, and director. She has starred in films that have premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, SXSW Film Festival, Tribeca Film Festival, Cannes Film Festival, and Telluride Film Festival. She graduated from Sarah Lawrence College with a bachelor of arts in theatre arts and art history. She most recently starred in Don't Leave Home , a feature filmed in Ireland

by director Michael Tully. Maude is the first film she has written and directed.

Kamau Bilal ( Baby Brother )

Kamau is a filmmaker, film editor, and documentary director of photography working in Missouri. Recently he photographed the HBO-commissioned documentary Stories Women Tell (2016 Tribeca Film Festival), and as an editor he cut A Stray (2016 SXSW Film Festival). He directed Crown Candy , co-directed with David Wilson in 2016, and What Kind of Man . Baby Brother is his latest short. He teaches editing and cinematography classes at the University of Missouri in the School of Visual Studies.

Niki Lindroth von Bahr ( The Burden )

Niki Lindroth von Bahr is an artist and director based in Stockholm. Her films The Burden (2017), Bath House (2014), and Tord and Tord (2010) have been screened at the Cannes Film Festival and the Sundance Film Festival. Niki got her master's degree in fine art at the Royal Institute of Art in Stockholm. She is also a freelancing costume designer and has, together with Nicklas Nilsson, worked with artists like

Fever Ray and David Bowie.

Mariama Diallo ( Hair Wolf )

Mariama Diallo is a Senegalese American writer and filmmaker based in Brooklyn. In 2015 Mariama co-wrote Everybody Dies! , which was directed by Frances Bodomo and formed part of the feature film Collective: Unconscious premiering at 2016's SXSW Film Festival. In 2016 she wrote and directed the short film Sketch , which had its world premiere at the New York African Film Festival and won the FOX Inclusion Emerging Voices Award at the BlackStar Film Festival.

Kangmin Kim ( JEOM )

Kangmin Kim, co-founder of Studio Zazac, is an award-winning Korean filmmaker and designer based in Los Angeles. His films have screened internationally at several festivals including the Sundance Film Festival, Annecy International Animated Film Festival, Ottawa International Animation Festival, AFI Fest, and more. His latest film, Deer Flower , premiered at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival and won the best animated short award at Aspen Shortsfest, as well as other awards.

Jérémy Comte ( Fauve )

Driven by a passion for skateboarding, Jeremy Comte directed his first short documentary, Feel The Hill , at eighteen years old, landing him a world tour with the Banff Mountain Film Festival. Raised in the countryside and later graduating from Concordia University in film production, his connection with nature and curiosity for the human condition deepened with his travels around the globe. Comte is roused by psychological, raw narratives finding meaningful connections through poetic imagery.

Álvaro Gago ( Matria )

Álvaro Gago graduated in audiovisual communication and music in Spain and studied theatre in Chicago and filmmaking in London. His first two short films, Curricán and Bombolles , played and won awards at several film festivals. His most recent short film, Matria , premiered at Valladolid International Film Festival, winning best national film. Currently, he is editing Trote , Xacio Baño’s first feature film, as well as developing both his next short film and first feature film script.

Saturday 1, September

Andrei Rublev

Andrei Rublev

Tarkovsky’s long banned masterpiece was inspired by the life of a great 15th-century Russian icon painter. This sweeping biography finds the artist losing his will to speak and create after witnessing the barbaric horrors that infect his war-torn, feudal country. Can he regain his faith and voice? This new restoration preserves Tarkovsky’s preferred 183-min. cut of his film, 15-20 minutes shorter than the longest version available. Tarkovsky made all the cuts himself, trimming “overly long scenes which had no significance,” according to him

Saturday 1, September

Sunday 2, September

Angels Wear White

Angels Wear White

Two pre-teen schoolgirls are assaulted by a middle-aged government official at a motel in a Chinese seaside town. Another young woman working the desk is the only witness to the crime (via surveillance camera). But will she report it? The aftermath proves as shocking and ugly as the incident itself in this searing, courageous critique of women’s status in contemporary China. “The perfect film for the #MeToo moment.” –IndieWire. Cleveland premiere. Subtitles.

Sunday 2, September

Andrei Rublev

Andrei Rublev

Tarkovsky’s long banned masterpiece was inspired by the life of a great 15th-century Russian icon painter. This sweeping biography finds the artist losing his will to speak and create after witnessing the barbaric horrors that infect his war-torn, feudal country. Can he regain his faith and voice? This new restoration preserves Tarkovsky’s preferred 183-min. cut of his film, 15-20 minutes shorter than the longest version available. Tarkovsky made all the cuts himself, trimming “overly long scenes which had no significance,” according to him

Sunday 2, September

2018 Sundance Film Festival Short Film Tour

2018 Sundance Film Festival Short Film Tour

NR

The 2018 Sundance Film Festival Short Film Tour is a 95-minute theatrical program of seven short films selected from this year’s Festival, widely considered the premier showcase for short films and the launchpad for many now-prominent independent filmmakers for more than 30 years. Including fiction, documentary and animation from around the world, the 2018 program offers new audiences a taste of what the Festival offers, from laugh-out-loud comedy to contemplative reflections of the world we live in.

Fueled by artistic expression and limited only by their runtime, short films transcend traditional storytelling. They are a significant and popular way artists can connect with audiences. From documentary to animation, narrative to experimental, the abbreviated form is made for risk-taking. The Festival has always treated short films with the highest regard and gives a home to both established and new

filmmakers with shorts for audiences to discover and celebrate.

The Festival's Short Film Program has long been established as a place to discover talented directors, such as past alums Damien Chazelle, Wes Anderson, Jill Soloway, Spike Jonze, Paul Thomas Anderson, Dee Rees, Taika Waititi, Trey Parker and Matt Stone, Lake Bell, Debra Granik, Jay and Mark Duplass, Todd Haynes, Lynne Ramsay, Andrea Arnold, and many others.

Program

Maude

U.S.A, 10 minutes. Written and directed by Anna Margaret Hollyman. Teeny thought it was just another routine babysitting job – until she's shocked to meet the client. As the day goes on, Teeny decides to become the woman she had no idea she always wanted to be...until she

gets caught.

Baby Brother

U.S.A., 14 minutes. Written and directed by Kamau Bilal.

The director's baby brother moves back in with his parents.

The Burden

Sweden, 14 minutes. Written and directed by Niki Lindroth vo n Bahr. A dark musical enacted in a modern shopping center, situated next to a large freeway. The employees of the various commercial venues deal with boredom and existential anxiety by performing cheerful musical turns. The apocalypse is a tempting liberator.

Hair Wolf

Short Film Jury Award: U.S. Fiction

U.S.A., 12 minutes. Written and directed by Mariama Diallo.

In a black hair salon in gentrifying Brooklyn, the local residents fend off a strange new monster: white women intent on sucking the lifeblood from black culture.

JEOM

U.S.A., South Korea, 4 minutes. Written and directed by Kangmin Kim.

A father and a son both have the same big birthmark on their butt. Believing that the two birthmarks are connected, the son scrubs his father's birthmark to remove it – but he just can't get rid of it.

Fauve

Short Film Special Jury Award

Canada, 16 minutes. Written and directed by Jérémy Comte.

Set in a surface mine, two boys sink into a seemingly innocent power game with Mother Nature as the sole observer.

Matria

Short Film Grand Jury Prize, Presented by YouTube Spain, 21 minutes. Written and directed by Álvaro Gago. Faced with a challenging daily routine, Ramona tries to take refuge in her relationships with her daughter and granddaughter.

Director Bios

Anna Margaret Hollyman ( Maude )

Anna Margaret Hollyman is an Austin-based actor, writer, and director. She has starred in films that have premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, SXSW Film Festival, Tribeca Film Festival, Cannes Film Festival, and Telluride Film Festival. She graduated from Sarah Lawrence College with a bachelor of arts in theatre arts and art history. She most recently starred in Don't Leave Home , a feature filmed in Ireland

by director Michael Tully. Maude is the first film she has written and directed.

Kamau Bilal ( Baby Brother )

Kamau is a filmmaker, film editor, and documentary director of photography working in Missouri. Recently he photographed the HBO-commissioned documentary Stories Women Tell (2016 Tribeca Film Festival), and as an editor he cut A Stray (2016 SXSW Film Festival). He directed Crown Candy , co-directed with David Wilson in 2016, and What Kind of Man . Baby Brother is his latest short. He teaches editing and cinematography classes at the University of Missouri in the School of Visual Studies.

Niki Lindroth von Bahr ( The Burden )

Niki Lindroth von Bahr is an artist and director based in Stockholm. Her films The Burden (2017), Bath House (2014), and Tord and Tord (2010) have been screened at the Cannes Film Festival and the Sundance Film Festival. Niki got her master's degree in fine art at the Royal Institute of Art in Stockholm. She is also a freelancing costume designer and has, together with Nicklas Nilsson, worked with artists like

Fever Ray and David Bowie.

Mariama Diallo ( Hair Wolf )

Mariama Diallo is a Senegalese American writer and filmmaker based in Brooklyn. In 2015 Mariama co-wrote Everybody Dies! , which was directed by Frances Bodomo and formed part of the feature film Collective: Unconscious premiering at 2016's SXSW Film Festival. In 2016 she wrote and directed the short film Sketch , which had its world premiere at the New York African Film Festival and won the FOX Inclusion Emerging Voices Award at the BlackStar Film Festival.

Kangmin Kim ( JEOM )

Kangmin Kim, co-founder of Studio Zazac, is an award-winning Korean filmmaker and designer based in Los Angeles. His films have screened internationally at several festivals including the Sundance Film Festival, Annecy International Animated Film Festival, Ottawa International Animation Festival, AFI Fest, and more. His latest film, Deer Flower , premiered at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival and won the best animated short award at Aspen Shortsfest, as well as other awards.

Jérémy Comte ( Fauve )

Driven by a passion for skateboarding, Jeremy Comte directed his first short documentary, Feel The Hill , at eighteen years old, landing him a world tour with the Banff Mountain Film Festival. Raised in the countryside and later graduating from Concordia University in film production, his connection with nature and curiosity for the human condition deepened with his travels around the globe. Comte is roused by psychological, raw narratives finding meaningful connections through poetic imagery.

Álvaro Gago ( Matria )

Álvaro Gago graduated in audiovisual communication and music in Spain and studied theatre in Chicago and filmmaking in London. His first two short films, Curricán and Bombolles , played and won awards at several film festivals. His most recent short film, Matria , premiered at Valladolid International Film Festival, winning best national film. Currently, he is editing Trote , Xacio Baño’s first feature film, as well as developing both his next short film and first feature film script.

Friday 31, August

Saturday 1, September

Show Future Dates
Andrei Rublev

Andrei Rublev

Tarkovsky’s long banned masterpiece was inspired by the life of a great 15th-century Russian icon painter. This sweeping biography finds the artist losing his will to speak and create after witnessing the barbaric horrors that infect his war-torn, feudal country. Can he regain his faith and voice? This new restoration preserves Tarkovsky’s preferred 183-min. cut of his film, 15-20 minutes shorter than the longest version available. Tarkovsky made all the cuts himself, trimming “overly long scenes which had no significance,” according to him

Saturday 1, September

Sunday 2, September

Show Future Dates
Angels Wear White

Angels Wear White

Two pre-teen schoolgirls are assaulted by a middle-aged government official at a motel in a Chinese seaside town. Another young woman working the desk is the only witness to the crime (via surveillance camera). But will she report it? The aftermath proves as shocking and ugly as the incident itself in this searing, courageous critique of women’s status in contemporary China. “The perfect film for the #MeToo moment.” –IndieWire. Cleveland premiere. Subtitles.

Sunday 2, September

Ava

Ava

NR

Based on her own adolescent experiences, Sadaf Foroughi’s Ava is a gripping debut about a young girl’s coming-of-age in a strict, traditional society. Living with her well-to-do parents in Tehran, Ava is a bright and focused teen whose concerns — friendships, music, social status, academic performance — resemble that of nearly any teenager. When Ava’s mistrustful and overprotective mother questions her relationship with a boy — going so far as to visit a gynecologist — Ava is overwhelmed by a newfound rage. Formerly a model student, Ava begins to rebel against the strictures imposed by her parents, her school, and the society at large.

Thursday 16, August

Friday 17, August

Show Future Dates
Becoming Who I Was

Becoming Who I Was

TBC

After a Buddhist boy in the highlands of northern India discovers that he is the reincarnation of a centuries-old Tibetan monk, his godfather takes him on a journey to discover his past.

Thursday 19, July

Sunday 22, July

Show Future Dates
Changes In The Village

Changes In The Village

In a career that spanned over 50 years and encompassed over 30 films, the late Sri Lankan filmmaker Lester James Peries established a Sinhalese cinema of international repute on a small island nation that resides in the shadow of a mighty, movie-producing neighbor, India. We have never shown a movie by this director who is frequently likened to Satyajit Ray, but that changes tonight with a rare screening of the film that first established Peries’ international reputation. Changes in the Village is a poetic family drama, spanning years, in which the daughter of a village chief is forced to marry a man she does not love. As usual with Peries, the family tensions mirror those of Sri Lankan society.

Saturday 25, August

Cold Water

Cold Water

NR

An acclaimed early work by Olivier Assayas that has long remained unavailable, the deeply felt coming-of-age drama Cold Water at long last makes its way to U.S. theaters. Drawing from his own youthful experiences, Assayas revisits the outskirts of Paris in the early 1970s, telling the story of teenage lovers Gilles (Cyprien Fouquet) and Christine (Virginie Ledoyen), whose open rebellion against family and society threatens to tear them apart, as Christine is sent to an institution by her parents and Gilles faces an uncertain future after running into trouble at school. With a rock soundtrack that vividly evokes the period, and provides the backdrop for one of the most memorable party sequences ever committed to film, Cold Water is a heartbreaking immersion into the emotional tumult of adolescence.

Sunday 29, July

Donna Haraway: Story Telling For Earthly Survival

Donna Haraway: Story Telling For Earthly Survival

Feminist thinker and science historian Donna Haraway breaks down the boundaries among humans, animals, and machines in her seminal works “A Cyborg Manifesto” and Primate Visions. This film captures Haraway in her hand-built California home, talking about her life, influences, and ideas, with topics ranging from capitalism, Catholicism, and colonialism to sex and marriage, sci-fi, and dogs. “An ode to this thinker’s expansive mind and life.” –Vice Magazine

Friday 31, August

Driftwood

Driftwood

The New Yorker calls this little known but fascinating and unusual movie an “electrifying, eccentric masterwork.” Young Natalie Wood plays a nine-year-old orphan who was raised by her preacher great-grandfather in a Western ghost town. She arrives in a different small town where her unfiltered outspokenness and sense of biblical morality upset the hypocritical locals. A collie and an epidemic heighten the drama. With Ruth Warrick, Walter Brennan, and Dean Jagger. Cleveland revival premiere. DCP. 88 min

Saturday 4, August

En El Septimo Dia

En El Septimo Dia

The first theatrical feature in 13 years by the acclaimed director of such indie classics as Our Song and Girls Town focuses on a group of undocumented immigrant workers in Brooklyn, NY. These men work six days a week at a variety of low-level jobs and savor their weekly soccer game on Sunday. But a crisis arises when their team reaches the league finals and their captain and star, a bike delivery person, suddenly has to work on Sundays. “Revolving around friendships, the pleasures of summer sport and the nitty-gritty of jobs that seldom take center stage, it's a work of unforced charm, a neorealist marvel.” –Hollywood Reporter. Cleveland premiere. Subtitles. DCP. 97 min. www

Saturday 18, August

Sunday 19, August

Show Future Dates
Final Portrait

Final Portrait

Rfor language, some sexual references and nudity.

In 1964, while on a short trip to Paris, the American writer and art-lover James Lord (Armie Hammer) is asked by his friend, the world-renowned artist Alberto Giacometti (Geoffrey Rush), to sit for a portrait. The process, Giacometti assures Lord, will take only a few days. Flattered and intrigued, Lord agrees. So begins not only the story of an offbeat friendship, but, seen through the eyes of Lord, an insight into the beauty, frustration, profundity and, at times, downright chaos of the artistic process. FINAL PORTRAIT is a portrait of a genius, and of a friendship between two men who are utterly different, yet increasingly bonded through a single, ever-evolving act of creativity. It is a film which shines a light on the artistic process itself, by turns exhilarating, exasperating and bewildering, questioning whether the gift of a great artist is a blessing or a curse.

Thursday 19, July

Sunday 22, July

Show Future Dates
Hellfire

Hellfire

Filmmaker Gina Telaroli, who works as Martin Scorsese’s video archivist, was a consultant on the recent film series “Martin Scorsese Presents Republic Rediscovered: New Restorations from Paramount Pictures,” which debuted in February at the Museum of Modern Art. She also cut the series trailer. Tonight Telaroli returns to her hometown to kick off our five-film Republic salute and introduce one of her favorite films from the MoMA retrospective. Hellfire is an unusual B western that was shot in two-strip Trucolor (a bargain-basement process heavy on oranges and blues). It tells of a reformed bad guy who pledges to build a church in honor of a self-sacrificing preacher he meets one day. William (“Wild Bill”) Elliott, Marie Windsor, and Forrest Tucker star. Cleveland revival premiere. DCP. 90 min.

Saturday 21, July

Henri-Georges Clouzot's Inferno

Henri-Georges Clouzot's Inferno

The story of a film that was never made, this fascinating documentary chronicles the ill-fated attempt by celebrated French director of The Wages of Fear and Diabolique to shoot a long-planned movie entitled Inferno during the 1960s. Starring Romy Schneider and Serge Reggiani, the movie, a tale of pathological jealousy, was going to incorporate some radical visual and sonic experiments worthy of the op-art era. Fortunately, among the 15 hours of footage that survive from this unrealized project are the shimmering, psychedelic color test reels featuring the 26-year-old (and sometimes nude) Schneider. Suplementing these dazzling screen tests are other rushes from the film—all unseen for decades—as well as interviews with surviving crew members (like Costa-Gavras) and reenactments of Inferno’s key scenes. Subtitles. DCP. 94 min.

Thursday 16, August

Friday 17, August

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I've Always Loved You

I've Always Loved You

We conclude our short Republic Pictures tribute with the most expensive film ever made by the studio up to its time. I’ve Always Loved You is a lavish romantic drama, fueled by the music of Rachmaninoff, Chopin, Beethoven, and others, about a promising Pennsylvania pianist (Catherine McLeod) who must choose between two men—her worldly, sophisticated concert pianist tutor (Philip Dorn) and a loyal family farmhand (William Carter) who has loved her for years. “With color by Technicolor, piano solos by Artur Rubinstein, and direction by A-lister Frank Borzage, Republic made a rare foray into high-budget filmmaking with this 1946 prestige production.” –MoMA. 35mm restored print courtesy of the UCLA Film & Television Archive. 117 min.

Saturday 18, August

La Verite (The Truth)

La Verite (The Truth)

Brigitte Bardot delivers her best performance in this Clouzot rarity. She plays Dominique, a modern, uninhibited young woman on trial for the murder of her sister’s fiancé who was also Dominique’s lover. Flashbacks re-create the events that led to this tragedy, and in time it becomes apparent that what’s really on trial is Dominique’s carefree, liberated, “immoral” lifestyle—a threat to the established social order. Cleveland revival premiere. Subtitles. DCP. 130 min

Sunday 26, August

Les Parents Terrible (The Storm Within)

Les Parents Terrible (The Storm Within)

Jean Marais and Josette Day, who played the two lovers in Cocteau’s Beauty and the Beast, reunited with the director two years later for this film version of a Cocteau stage play. The movie charts the emotional turmoil that ensues within a dysfunctional middle-class family when the son announces his intention to marry. His jealous mother (who harbors incestuous feelings for her child) is absolutely distraught—while his father is distressed that his own mistress is now his son’s betrothed. Cocteau foregoes exterior shots but still manages to turn a claustrophobic stage piece into pure cinema. “An astonishingly dynamic film…Melodrama of the highest order.” –Time Out Film Guide. Cleveland revival premiere. Subtitles. DCP. 105 min.

Thursday 2, August

Sunday 5, August

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Manon

Manon

Winner of the top prize at the 1949 Venice Film Festival, this Clouzot rarity transposes Abbé Prévost’s 1731 novel Manon Lescaut to post-WWII France. It tells of a French Resistance fighter (Michel Auclair) who rescues a young woman accused of being a Nazi collaborator (Cécile Aubry) from villagers who want to do her harm. Falling for her, he takes her to Paris. But there she is further tainted by her shady brother (Serge Reggiani). Subtitles. 100 min.

Saturday 11, August

Mrs. Hyde

Mrs. Hyde

Isabelle Huppert stars in this oddly comic variant on Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. A meek, ineffectual, disliked science teacher at a French vocational school catering to immigrant teens turns into a confident, empowered instructor—and a dangerous nocturnal creature—after she is struck by lightning. A 2017 New York Film Festival selection. With Romain Duris. “In addition to often being quite funny, Serge Bozon's feature is an exemplary film about pedagogy.”

Thursday 26, July

Sunday 29, July

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One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest

One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest

Rebellious patient/prisoner Randle McMurphy (Jack Nicholson) goes head to head with strict, steely head nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) in this rousing, subversive classic set inside an Oregon mental institution. It became the first film to sweep the top five Academy Awards (best picture, director, actor, actress, screenplay) since 1934’s It Happened One Night. The great supporting cast includes Scatman Crothers, Danny DeVito, Brad Dourif, Christopher Lloyd, William Redfield, Will Sampson, and Vincent Schiavelli. From the novel by Ken Kesey

Friday 27, July

Saturday 28, July

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One Sings, the Other Doesn't

One Sings, the Other Doesn't

TBC

Agnés Varda’s enchanting ode to female friendship and liberation is part blissed-out bohemian musical, part revolutionary cri de cœur. Spanning more than a decade, it traces the ups and downs—abortion, heartbreak, marriage, motherhood—of two friends, Pauline (Mairesse) and Suzanne (Liotard). Even as their lives radically diverge, they remain steadfastly devoted to one another while finding ways to empower other women: one as a traveling feminist folk singer, the other as a reproductive rights activist. Set against France’s pro-choice struggle—of which Varda herself was on the frontlines—this tender and intimate epic celebrates the power of women to lift one another up.

Saturday 18, August

Sunday 19, August

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Quai des Orfèvres

Quai des Orfèvres

NR

When the sleazy movie financier who has been pursuing nightclub performer Jenny Lamour (Suzy Delair) turns up dead, her jealous husband (Bernard Blier) is the prime suspect in Inspector Antoine's (Louis Jouvet) investigation for the Quai des Orfèvres, France's Scotland Yard.

Friday 20, July

Sunday 22, July

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Revenge

Revenge

Rfor strong bloody gruesome violence, a rape, sexuality, graphic nudity, drug use and language

Never take your mistress on an annual guys' getaway, especially one devoted to hunting - a violent lesson for three wealthy married men.

Saturday 21, July

Saving Brinton

Saving Brinton

UN

In a farmhouse basement on the Iowa countryside, eccentric collector Mike Zahs makes a remarkable discovery: the showreels of the man who brought moving pictures to America’s Heartland. Among the treasures: rare footage of President Teddy Roosevelt, the first moving images from Burma, a lost relic from magical effects godfather Georges Méliés. These are the films that introduced movies to the world. And they didn’t end up in Iowa by accident. The old nitrate reels are just some of the artifacts that belonged to William Franklin Brinton. From thousands of trinkets, handwritten journals, receipts, posters and catalogs emerges the story of an inventive farmboy who became America’s greatest barnstorming movieman. As Mike uncovers this hidden legacy, he begins a journey to restore the Brinton name that takes us to The Library of Congress, Paris and back for a big screen extravaganza in the same small-town movie theater where Frank first turned on a projector over a century ago. By uniting community through a pride in their living history, Mike embodies a welcome antidote to the breakneck pace of our disposable society. "Saving Brinton" is a portrait of this unlikely Midwestern folk hero, at once a meditation on living simply and a celebration of dreaming big.

Thursday 9, August

Friday 10, August

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Sorcerer

Sorcerer

Roy Scheider stars in William Friedkin’s big-budget reimagining of The Wages of Fear (see 8/4 at 6:50). Four desperate men of differing nationalities come together in South America to transport explosive nitroglycerine by truck across 300 miles of treacherous jungle roads. A huge critical and box office flop when first released, Friedkin’s follow-up to The Exorcist is now regarded by some as a masterpiece. (Friedkin himself ranks this nail-biter as one of his best movies.) Music by Tangerine Dream. Cleveland revival premiere. DCP. 121 min.

Saturday 4, August

Thursday 9, August

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Sweet Sweetback's Baadassss Song

Sweet Sweetback's Baadassss Song

Here’s a new restoration of the seminal movie that helped launch the whole blaxploitation craze, though it’s more of an independent art film than an exploitation movie. Melvin Van Peebles produced, wrote, directed, edited, scored, and starred in this angry, blistering, hallucinatory tale of a stud on the run after being accused of killing two corrupt cops. It’s dedicated “to all the Brothers and Sisters who have had enough of The Man.” No one under 18 admitted! Cleveland revival premiere. DCP. 97 min.

Thursday 26, July

Saturday 28, July

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Tale of Cinema

Tale of Cinema

Undistributed theatrically in the U.S. until now, the celebrated sixth film by master South Korean moviemaker Hong Sang-soo integrates assorted characters and incidents—two men involved with the same woman, a night of drinking and failed sex, a suicide pact—into a surprising and sometimes disorienting narrative at once wry, moving, and profound. The less you know about this movie before you see it, the better. 100% critics rating on RottenTomatoes.com. “Has a sheer simplicity and clarity—plus an attractive underlying optimism—that could win [Hong] new friends on the international arthouse circuit.” –Variety

Saturday 11, August

Sunday 12, August

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That Brennan Girl

That Brennan Girl

The opening night film in February’s “Republic Rediscovered” series at MoMA was this obscure but affecting tale of sin and redemption. The film focuses on an unloved teenager (Mona Freeman) who learns unhelpful life lessons from her prostitute mother before falling in with a charming con man (James Dunn) and growing up to be an unfit mother herself. Stylishly directed, this was the final movie by the underrated Alfred Santell. Cleveland revival premiere. DCP. 95 min.

Sunday 12, August

That Summer

That Summer

NR

Welcome to Grey Gardens…as you’ve never seen it before. Three years before the Maysles’ landmark documentary introduced the world to Edith and Edie Beale—the unforgettable mother-daughter (and Jackie O. relatives) living in a decaying dream world on Long Island—renowned photographer Peter Beard chronicled life at their crumbling estate during one summer in 1972. For the first time ever, director Göran Olsson (The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975) assembles this long-lost footage—featuring glimpses of luminaries like Andy Warhol, Mick Jagger, and Truman Capote—into a one-of-a-kind family portrait bursting with the loving squabbles, quotable bon mots, and impromptu musical numbers that would make Big and Little Edie beloved cultural icons.

Friday 10, August

Sunday 12, August

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The Day After

The Day After

UN

South Korean Master Hong Sangsoo’s 21st feature as director, The Day After, is a mordantly comic tale of infidelity and mistaken identity. Book publisher Bongwan’s (Kwon Haehyo) marriage is on the rocks after his wife (Cho Yunhee) discovers the affair he’s been having with his assistant (Kim Saebyuk). Now that relationship is ending too and Bongwan’s new assistant, the sharp and sensitive Areum (Kim Minhee), on her first day in the office, is left to navigate the fallout of all the turnover in Bongwan’s life.

With its ingeniously destabilizing leaps through time and stark black and white cinematography, The Day After begins as a darkly hilarious story of a man embroiled in extramarital entanglements but soon shifts—in a way only Hong can manage—into a heartfelt portrayal of a young woman on a quest for spiritual fulfillment.

Thursday 2, August

Sunday 5, August

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The Guardians

The Guardians

RFor some violence and sexuality.

During the First World War, Hortense, a tireless worker, hired Francine, a young woman from public assistance, to help her because her own daughter Solange was reluctant to submit. Between Hortense and Francine, mutual respect and recognition are established from the outset. But to save the cohesion of her family, Hortense will have to sacrifice the young woman and pay the price ...

Friday 3, August

Sunday 5, August

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The Gunfighter

The Gunfighter

Gregory Peck plays a notorious gunfighter, weary of killing and of all the young punks who continually challenge him, in this superb psychological western, one of the masterpieces of the genre. 35mm. 84 min. It will be preceded at 7:00 by Gena Telaroli’s 14-min. short film This Castle Keep (USA, 2016, DCP), shown at the 2017 New York Film Festival and partly inspired by The Gunfighter, among other films. Telaroli, who is also Martin Scorsese’s video archivist, will introduce both movies starting at 7:00.

Saturday 21, July

The Lost One

The Lost One

The only film written and directed by Peter Lorre (who also stars) is a noir drama about a German scientist, working for the Nazis during WWII, who discovers that his lover has been selling his findings to the Allies. “Absolutely phenomenal.” –Time Out Film Guide. Subtitles. 98 min.

Sunday 19, August

The Murderer Lives At Number 21

The Murderer Lives At Number 21

Clouzot’s first feature is a comic mystery-thriller in which a wry police detective (Pierre Fresnay) impersonates a pastor in order to ferret out a serial killer living in a boarding house full of eccentrics. Undistributed in the U.S., this classic will be shown in a copy imported from France. With Suzy Delair. Subtitles. DCP. 83 min.

Friday 27, July

Sunday 29, July

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The Mystery of Picasso

The Mystery of Picasso

Pablo Picasso paints on “transparent” canvases (so we, positioned behind the works, can watch them take shape, almost like animation) in this unique art film that amply demonstrates the great artist’s fluid technique and fertile imagination. (He also talks about his work.) The 15 pictures Picasso creates during this movie were destroyed after the filming, so they now exist only in this documentary. Though a departure for director Clouzot, The Mystery of Picasso remains “one of the most joyful of all records of an artist at work,” according to critic Pauline Kael. Color cinematography by Claude Renoir, Pierre Auguste’s grandson. Subtitles. 75 min.

Saturday 1, September

The Red Pony

The Red Pony

Robert Mitchum, Myrna Loy, Louis Calhern, and Margaret Hamilton star in this color screen adaptation of John Steinbeck’s novella. Boasting a screenplay written by Steinbeck himself and a famous musical score composed by Aaron Copland, this sensitive movie tells of a California farm boy (Peter Miles) who escapes his unhappy home life by lavishing attention on a newborn colt. 89 min.

Saturday 28, July

The Scarlet Letter

The Scarlet Letter

Brigitte Bardot delivers her best performance in this Clouzot rarity. She plays Dominique, a modern, uninhibited young woman on trial for the murder of her sister’s fiancé who was also Dominique’s lover. Flashbacks re-create the events that led to this tragedy, and in time it becomes apparent that what’s really on trial is Dominique’s carefree, liberated, “immoral” lifestyle—a threat to the established social order. Cleveland revival premiere. Subtitles. DCP. 130 min

Thursday 30, August

The Smallest Show on Earth

The Smallest Show on Earth

The ticket seller is surly, the projectionist is tipsy, the shabby auditorium is a flea-pit, and business is lousy. If this sounds like the old Cinematheque, it isn’t. It’s the Bijou Kinema, a run-down British movie house newly inherited by a young couple (Virginia McKenna, Bill Travers) who have also inherited the cinema’s eccentric staff. (Projectionist Peter Sellers and box office worker Margaret Rutherford are among them.) Shall the new owners shutter the theater and sell the property to their main competitor? (He needs a parking lot for his modern Grand cinema.) Or try to make a go of it, against all odds? Don’t miss this delightful British comedy classic in a 35mm print imported from England. Preceded at 7:00 by Charles R. Bowers’ outrageous silent comedy Now You Tell One (USA, 1926, co-directed by Harold L. Muller, DCP), a largely forgotten screen gem. Total 102 min

Saturday 11, August

The Third Murder

The Third Murder

NR

Leading attorney Shigemori takes on the defence of murder-robbery suspect Misumi who served jail time for another murder 30 years ago. Shigemori’s chances of winning the case seem low - his client freely admits his guilt, despite facing the death penalty if he is convicted. As he digs deeper into the case, as he hears the testimonies of the victim’s family and Misumi himself, the once confident Shigemori begins to doubt whether his client is the murderer after all.

Saturday 25, August

Sunday 26, August

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The Wages of Fear

The Wages of Fear

Yves Montand stars in this classic French thriller, one of the most suspenseful movies ever made! Set in a Central American petroleum republic, the film follows four down-on-their-luck drifters who take on a veritable suicide mission: driving two truckloads of volatile nitroglycerine across 300 miles of perilous mountain roads. Original, uncut version! Subtitles. 147 min

Saturday 4, August

Wanda

Wanda

The only film written and directed by Elia Kazan’s wife Barbara Loden is a work of American neorealism and one of the great one-offs in cinema history. (Loden died from cancer before she could make a second movie.) Shot in 16mm, this unadorned indie classic also stars Loden as the timid, bedraggled title character—a divorced, destitute housewife from a Pennsylvania mining town. Prone to looking for love in all the wrong places, Wanda eventually hooks up with a small-time bank robber. “If there is a female counterpart to John Cassavetes, Barbara Loden is it.” –The New Yorker. Cleveland revival premiere.

Saturday 25, August

Sunday 26, August

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